Idaho History

Idaho History

Juveniles acting like hoodlums were a common problem in early Boise

Juvenile delinquency has been a social problem throughout Idaho’s history, and although only a few girls got into trouble, many unsupervised boys did. The Statesman used the word “hoodlums” to describe an event that happened in September 1874: “Young imps” were seen pilfering peaches and plums from a local fruit stand, and two 17- or 18-year old girls ran away before anyone could get their names.

Idaho History

Tracking how the historical society became a state agency in Idaho

When a group of 30 Idaho pioneers gathered to have their photograph taken on Oct. 16, 1897, the Idaho Statesman published their names with the date of their arrival in Idaho Territory. Some, who had crossed the plains by ox-cart in the 1850s and ’60s, had settled in Oregon before being drawn back to Idaho by the gold rush to Boise Basin, and the market this presented for farmers and businesses of all kinds.

Idaho History

Pioneer Society’s inactivity drew fire and prompted a rebirth to record Idaho’s history

The Historical Society of Idaho Pioneers, founded in 1881, had not met for five years when it was reactivated in February 1886. A dozen notable pioneers who had not become members before were now admitted: John Lemp, Jonas W. Brown, John M. Cannaday, Isaac N. Coston, George Redway, G.T. Keys, Thomas E Logan, Charles Himrod, Thomas Davis, Thomas S. Hart, George Ainslie and James A. Pinney. Lemp, Logan, Himrod and Pinney had all served as mayor of Boise City, and Ainslie had served two terms in Congress.

Columnist Arthur Hart says people will always enjoy history because it's about people

Arthur Hart shares his love for history as a teacher, museum director and in his columns found in the pages of the Idaho Statesman.