Idaho

Boise mass stabbing suspect will receive more mental health treatment at state prison

Here’s where the case for suspect in Boise mass stabbing stands

Timmy Earl Kinner Jr. Kinner is charged with first-degree murder in the death of Ruya Kadir. He’s facing numerous other charges, including eight counts of aggravated assault. Here's where Kinner's court case stands.
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Timmy Earl Kinner Jr. Kinner is charged with first-degree murder in the death of Ruya Kadir. He’s facing numerous other charges, including eight counts of aggravated assault. Here's where Kinner's court case stands.

Timmy Earl Kinner Jr.’s treatment at a secure mental health facility in state prison has been extended, according to online court records.

He’s been under treatment for three months so far. It’s unclear how long his treatment has been extended because the order was filed under seal.

Kinner, 31, is accused of stabbing nine people at a 3-year-old’s birthday party in Boise last June. He’s charged with 13 felony crimes, including first-degree murder in 3-year-old Ruya Kadir’s death. If convicted of murder, he faces the death penalty.

An evaluation of Kinner was filed last Thursday, and an order extending Kinner’s commitment was filed Friday. Kinner was scheduled to be transported to court for a hearing this Wednesday; that hearing is listed online as closed to the public.

Kinner’s defense attorneys also filed two motions earlier this month: one seeking disclosure of the votes of the grand jury in Kinner’s indictment, and the other asking for a gag order prohibiting witnesses, victims, attorneys and others from discussing the case with the media. They said the “inordinate amount of media coverage” has possibly violated the defendant’s Sixth Amendment right to a fair trial.

Prosecutors filed a motion objecting to the disclosure of the juror votes. They argued that grand jury proceedings are confidential so that jurors are free from outside influence or intimidation.

A jury trial is set for Jan 13, 2020.

Late last year, a psychiatrist who evaluated Kinner determined that he was not competent to stand trial, a finding that prosecutors challenged at a multiday evidentiary hearing in December and January.

On Jan. 16, 4th District Court Judge Nancy Baskin ruled that Kinner is “dangerously mentally ill,” unable to assist in his own defense and a flight risk. She committed him to a secure mental health facility at the maximum security prison south of Boise for up to 90 days of treatment, with the goal of restoring his mental competency.

Kinner’s mental health came into question long before he arrived in Boise, as did signs of drug use. A judge was asked in 2009 to send him through anger management training and substance abuse treatment, and his mental competency was evaluated in 2012, Tennessee and federal court records show.

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