Crime

No-contact order dismissed in Middleton mayor’s domestic battery case, per wife’s request

How to support victims of domestic abuse

Whether someone has asked you for help or you sense someone is in distress, here are some general guidelines to help support possible victims of abuse, be it physical, emotional, sexual, psychological or financial.
Up Next
Whether someone has asked you for help or you sense someone is in distress, here are some general guidelines to help support possible victims of abuse, be it physical, emotional, sexual, psychological or financial.

Middleton Mayor Darin Taylor still awaits trial on his domestic battery charge, but on Monday a judge agreed to dismiss the no-contact order that was in place between Taylor and his alleged victim — his fifth wife.

Taylor was arrested March 2 for reportedly grabbing his wife and refusing to let her leave their home, according to court records. He has pleaded not guilty to one count of misdemeanor domestic battery.

On Monday, Magistrate Judge James Peart agreed to dismiss the no-contact order that had been in place, after his wife requested that the order be dismissed.

A witness at the home in March told told deputies that the incident was not the first instance of domestic violence. She alleged that similar incidents have taken place for years.

“Last weekend Darin grabbed (his wife) by the throat and walked her down the hallway until she fell down,” the deputy’s report said. “(The relative) said (Taylor’s wife) since that incident complained about a clicking in her throat and she has a large bruise on her upper right arm.”

Since Taylor’s arrest, the Middleton City Council has twice asked him to resign. Taylor, who was elected as mayor in 2011 and survived a recall vote in 2012, is set to hold the office until December.

The City Council first issued a no-confidence vote and a request for his resignation at March 6 meeting that he did not attend. Then, at a City Council meeting March 20, the council unanimously passed a resolution declaring no confidence in Taylor and requesting his immediate resignation.

Taylor has not resigned. He did not return a call to the Idaho Statesman on Tuesday requesting comment.

The next City Council meeting is scheduled for Wednesday evening, and the agenda posted Tuesday does not make note of the prior resolution asking Taylor to resign.

Taylor has been out of jail on bond since March 4, and his next court appearance is scheduled for 1:30 p.m. April 25. His case is being prosecuted by a special prosecutor from the Idaho Attorney General’s Office because the Canyon County Prosecutor’s Office declared a conflict of interest with the case.

Related stories from Idaho Statesman

  Comments