In this May 30, 2015 photo, Henry T. Nicholas III talks during the Nicholas Academic Center's 2015 Graduation ceremony at the Disneyland Hotel in Anaheim, Calif. After his sister was murdered, Nicholas III spent millions to enshrine a so-called bill of rights for crime victims into California's constitution. Now, he is taking his effort across the nation, spending millions on teams of lobbyists and PR companies to influence legislatures and amend state constitutions all over the country.
In this May 30, 2015 photo, Henry T. Nicholas III talks during the Nicholas Academic Center's 2015 Graduation ceremony at the Disneyland Hotel in Anaheim, Calif. After his sister was murdered, Nicholas III spent millions to enshrine a so-called bill of rights for crime victims into California's constitution. Now, he is taking his effort across the nation, spending millions on teams of lobbyists and PR companies to influence legislatures and amend state constitutions all over the country. Eric Reed AP Images for Nicholas Academic Centers file
In this May 30, 2015 photo, Henry T. Nicholas III talks during the Nicholas Academic Center's 2015 Graduation ceremony at the Disneyland Hotel in Anaheim, Calif. After his sister was murdered, Nicholas III spent millions to enshrine a so-called bill of rights for crime victims into California's constitution. Now, he is taking his effort across the nation, spending millions on teams of lobbyists and PR companies to influence legislatures and amend state constitutions all over the country. Eric Reed AP Images for Nicholas Academic Centers file

Across the US, crime victims’ rights campaign faces fresh local skepticism

December 27, 2017 05:20 PM