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Students post video of Idaho senator threatening to call police on them 0:32

Students post video of Idaho senator threatening to call police on them

Idaho students say they had meeting set with senator. He threatened to call police. 0:35

Idaho students say they had meeting set with senator. He threatened to call police.

Idaho House members applaud Hailey man involved in Bundy standoff 0:29

Idaho House members applaud Hailey man involved in Bundy standoff

'No workplace is immune' to harassment, says former state worker behind tort claim 2:33

'No workplace is immune' to harassment, says former state worker behind tort claim

New ad targets Idaho's Raúl Labrador over tax reform 0:31

New ad targets Idaho's Raúl Labrador over tax reform

'Go straight to hell,' Idaho senator tells apparent critic at county fair 0:44

'Go straight to hell,' Idaho senator tells apparent critic at county fair

Idaho's Gov. Cecil Andrus laid to rest 1:30

Idaho's Gov. Cecil Andrus laid to rest

Celebrate the life of Gov. Andrus, a statesman, father and Idaho icon 2:14

Celebrate the life of Gov. Andrus, a statesman, father and Idaho icon

Former Idaho Gov. Cecil Andrus lies in state in the Capitol rotunda 1:55

Former Idaho Gov. Cecil Andrus lies in state in the Capitol rotunda

Cecil Andrus' casket arrives at the Statehouse to lie in state 2:22

Cecil Andrus' casket arrives at the Statehouse to lie in state

Colette Raptosh, 16, left, and Nora Harren, 17, students at Capital and Borah high schools respectively, are organizing Women's March on Idaho because they realized nobody else was. Not able to vote in this year's election, the two wanted to do more than just post their views on social media. The activists decided to get an event rolling in concert with the national women's march set for Jan. 21, 2017—but with a broader human rights theme directed at Idaho issues. Darin Oswald doswald@idahostatesman.com
Colette Raptosh, 16, left, and Nora Harren, 17, students at Capital and Borah high schools respectively, are organizing Women's March on Idaho because they realized nobody else was. Not able to vote in this year's election, the two wanted to do more than just post their views on social media. The activists decided to get an event rolling in concert with the national women's march set for Jan. 21, 2017—but with a broader human rights theme directed at Idaho issues. Darin Oswald doswald@idahostatesman.com

Weekend women’s march in Boise expected to draw thousands

January 18, 2017 03:56 PM

More Videos

Students post video of Idaho senator threatening to call police on them 0:32

Students post video of Idaho senator threatening to call police on them

Idaho students say they had meeting set with senator. He threatened to call police. 0:35

Idaho students say they had meeting set with senator. He threatened to call police.

Idaho House members applaud Hailey man involved in Bundy standoff 0:29

Idaho House members applaud Hailey man involved in Bundy standoff

'No workplace is immune' to harassment, says former state worker behind tort claim 2:33

'No workplace is immune' to harassment, says former state worker behind tort claim

New ad targets Idaho's Raúl Labrador over tax reform 0:31

New ad targets Idaho's Raúl Labrador over tax reform

'Go straight to hell,' Idaho senator tells apparent critic at county fair 0:44

'Go straight to hell,' Idaho senator tells apparent critic at county fair

Idaho's Gov. Cecil Andrus laid to rest 1:30

Idaho's Gov. Cecil Andrus laid to rest

Celebrate the life of Gov. Andrus, a statesman, father and Idaho icon 2:14

Celebrate the life of Gov. Andrus, a statesman, father and Idaho icon

Former Idaho Gov. Cecil Andrus lies in state in the Capitol rotunda 1:55

Former Idaho Gov. Cecil Andrus lies in state in the Capitol rotunda

Cecil Andrus' casket arrives at the Statehouse to lie in state 2:22

Cecil Andrus' casket arrives at the Statehouse to lie in state