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  • Young women organize human rights march in Boise

    Colette Raptosh, 16, left, and Nora Harren, 17, students at Capital and Borah high schools respectively, are organizing Women's March on Idaho because they realized nobody else was. Not able to vote in this year's election, the two wanted to do more than just post their views on social media. The activists decided to get an event rolling in concert with the national women's march set for Jan. 21, 2017—but with a broader human rights theme directed at Idaho issues.

Colette Raptosh, 16, left, and Nora Harren, 17, students at Capital and Borah high schools respectively, are organizing Women's March on Idaho because they realized nobody else was. Not able to vote in this year's election, the two wanted to do more than just post their views on social media. The activists decided to get an event rolling in concert with the national women's march set for Jan. 21, 2017—but with a broader human rights theme directed at Idaho issues. Darin Oswald doswald@idahostatesman.com
Colette Raptosh, 16, left, and Nora Harren, 17, students at Capital and Borah high schools respectively, are organizing Women's March on Idaho because they realized nobody else was. Not able to vote in this year's election, the two wanted to do more than just post their views on social media. The activists decided to get an event rolling in concert with the national women's march set for Jan. 21, 2017—but with a broader human rights theme directed at Idaho issues. Darin Oswald doswald@idahostatesman.com

Weekend women’s march in Boise expected to draw thousands

January 18, 2017 3:56 PM