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  • Young women organize human rights march in Boise

    Colette Raptosh, 16, left, and Nora Harren, 17, students at Capital and Borah high schools respectively, are organizing Women's March on Idaho because they realized nobody else was. Not able to vote in this year's election, the two wanted to do more than just post their views on social media. The activists decided to get an event rolling in concert with the national women's march set for Jan. 21, 2017—but with a broader human rights theme directed at Idaho issues.

Colette Raptosh, 16, left, and Nora Harren, 17, students at Capital and Borah high schools respectively, are organizing Women's March on Idaho because they realized nobody else was. Not able to vote in this year's election, the two wanted to do more than just post their views on social media. The activists decided to get an event rolling in concert with the national women's march set for Jan. 21, 2017—but with a broader human rights theme directed at Idaho issues. Darin Oswald doswald@idahostatesman.com
Colette Raptosh, 16, left, and Nora Harren, 17, students at Capital and Borah high schools respectively, are organizing Women's March on Idaho because they realized nobody else was. Not able to vote in this year's election, the two wanted to do more than just post their views on social media. The activists decided to get an event rolling in concert with the national women's march set for Jan. 21, 2017—but with a broader human rights theme directed at Idaho issues. Darin Oswald doswald@idahostatesman.com

They can’t yet vote, but that just motivates the two teens behind Boise women’s march

December 19, 2016 07:57 PM

UPDATED December 23, 2016 07:20 AM

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  • 'No workplace is immune' to harassment, says former state worker behind tort claim

    Lourdes Matsumoto says she was subjected to a variety of sexual and racial harassment and other concerning behavior by a supervisor at the Idaho State Controller's Office. Dec. 8, 2017, a day after announcing her claim against the state was settled, she spoke about the bigger picture of sexual harassment across the country and about the #metoo movement. "I think it's really important that employers do the right thing, and they take employee reports seriously and do honest investigations and really look at what's in the best interests of protecting their employees when it comes to harassment and discrimination."