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  • Young women organize human rights march in Boise

    Colette Raptosh, 16, left, and Nora Harren, 17, students at Capital and Borah high schools respectively, are organizing Women's March on Idaho because they realized nobody else was. Not able to vote in this year's election, the two wanted to do more than just post their views on social media. The activists decided to get an event rolling in concert with the national women's march set for Jan. 21, 2017—but with a broader human rights theme directed at Idaho issues.

Colette Raptosh, 16, left, and Nora Harren, 17, students at Capital and Borah high schools respectively, are organizing Women's March on Idaho because they realized nobody else was. Not able to vote in this year's election, the two wanted to do more than just post their views on social media. The activists decided to get an event rolling in concert with the national women's march set for Jan. 21, 2017—but with a broader human rights theme directed at Idaho issues. Darin Oswald doswald@idahostatesman.com
Colette Raptosh, 16, left, and Nora Harren, 17, students at Capital and Borah high schools respectively, are organizing Women's March on Idaho because they realized nobody else was. Not able to vote in this year's election, the two wanted to do more than just post their views on social media. The activists decided to get an event rolling in concert with the national women's march set for Jan. 21, 2017—but with a broader human rights theme directed at Idaho issues. Darin Oswald doswald@idahostatesman.com

They can’t yet vote, but that just motivates the two teens behind Boise women’s march

December 19, 2016 7:57 PM

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    A Latah County sheriff's deputy captured this interaction with state Sen. Dan Foreman, R-Viola, at the Latah County Fair Sept. 14, 2017.