Boise State Football

Boise State’s defensive front seven must slow New Mexico running game

New Mexico running back Teriyon Gipson runs between Boise State defenders Ben Weaver, left, and Corey Bell during a Mountain West football game Nov. 8, 2014, in Albuquerque. Gipson ran for 205 yards and three touchdowns in that 60-49 loss, and he ran for a score during last year’s victory in Boise.
New Mexico running back Teriyon Gipson runs between Boise State defenders Ben Weaver, left, and Corey Bell during a Mountain West football game Nov. 8, 2014, in Albuquerque. Gipson ran for 205 yards and three touchdowns in that 60-49 loss, and he ran for a score during last year’s victory in Boise. Idaho Statesman file

Boise State will get its stops against New Mexico’s relentless rushing attack, but since the Lobos will give body blow after body blow before trying to break a big run, patience is a virtue.

“You could go out there as a defensive player and get 50 snaps in the game, 49 of them be perfect, but on that one you messed up, they can punch it for 80 yards,” senior defensive end Sam McCaskill said.

The Lobos are ranked No. 2 in the nation in rushing offense, averaging 347 yards per game. Six players average at least five carries a game.

It will be a challenge for the Broncos no matter what, especially with two starting linebackers dealing with injuries in recent weeks. Junior Joe Martarano has not played since the first half of the season opener Sept. 3, and senior Tanner Vallejo missed Saturday’s win over Utah State.

“We all prepare like we’re going to get that spot, no matter who it is,” Boise State junior linebacker Blake Whitlock said. “Nobody’s Superman, everybody’s susceptible.”

Expect New Mexico to focus on the run, as usual, and not stray much, especially with Lamar Jordan at the helm. The junior quarterback has run for 146 yards the last two weeks, and with the team’s top throwing quarterback, Austin Apodaca, likely out with an injury, the Lobos won’t go to the air much at all.

“Yeah, Lamar can throw it and we’re comfortable, but not as comfortable as Austin,” New Mexico coach Bob Davie said. “But let’s be honest, if we get into any kind of a throwing game, I don’t think we’re going to win that one.”

Born to run

New Mexico’s rushing statistics and number of passing attempts in each game against Boise State since Bob Davie became the Lobos’ coach in 2012:

 

Year

Att

Yds

TD

Pass

2012

54

330

4

12

2013

53

300

2

17

2014

49

505

6

16

2015

39

195

4

13

Total

195

1,330

16

58

Avg.

48.8

332.5

4.0

14.5

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