Crime

Faucher’s appeal of 25-year sentence for child porn, drug crimes ‘conditionally dismissed’

‘I don’t think this is the end of my legacy,’ says Rev. W. Thomas Faucher

Rev. W. Thomas Faucher speaks to the Idaho Statesman from the Ada County Jail about how he would like to be remembered in the community and what will happen after his trial.
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Rev. W. Thomas Faucher speaks to the Idaho Statesman from the Ada County Jail about how he would like to be remembered in the community and what will happen after his trial.

The Rev. William Thomas Faucher is trying to appeal the 25-year prison sentence imposed on him by 4th District Judge Jason Scott in December, but he has failed to pay required fees or to get a court waiver.

So his appeal was “conditionally dismissed” Thursday, according to Idaho Supreme Court documents.

The proceedings associated with the appeal are suspended for 21 days, giving Faucher time to pay the fees or obtain an order waiving them. If Faucher doesn’t meet that deadline, the appeal will be dismissed without further notice.

The fees are for preparation of the court clerk’s record and court transcripts.

The 73-year-old retired priest was charged with 24 crimes: 21 counts of sexual exploitation of a child (possession and distribution of child pornography) and three counts of drug possession (marijuana, LSD, ecstasy). He pleaded guilty to five felonies.

Scott sentenced Faucher to 25 years in prison, without the possibility of parole.

Faucher filed a notice of appeal with the Ada County Clerk’s Office on Feb 1. According to the document, the issue on appeal is: “Did the presiding judge abuse his discretion in imposition of the sentence?” He filed the notice “pro se,” which means he intends to represent himself.

Faucher still could file a motion for appointment of counsel (state appellate public defender), a court official told the Statesman. If a public defender were appointed, the cost would be covered by Ada County.

Faucher indicated in his filing that he should be exempt from fees associated with filing the appeal, the transcript fee and the preparation of the records because he is indigent.

Katy Moeller has worked at The Idaho Statesman for 13 years. She’s a generalist, an investigative reporter and a feature writer who has been on the breaking news team for a decade. She was Idaho Press Club’s 2016 Print Reporter of the Year.If you like seeing stories like this, please consider supporting our work with a digital subscription to the Idaho Statesman.

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