Boise & Garden City

Several lots in the Boise Foothills were auctioned off. Only one buyer paid up.

A year of earth slippage in the Boise Foothills

Since early 2016, the ground under a handful of homes on North Alto Via Court in the Boise Foothills has been slowly sliding downhill. The movement has rendered most of the homes on Alto Via uninhabitable.
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Since early 2016, the ground under a handful of homes on North Alto Via Court in the Boise Foothills has been slowly sliding downhill. The movement has rendered most of the homes on Alto Via uninhabitable.

There was high interest when five empty lots were auctioned last month on Alto Via Court and Strata Via Place in the Boise Foothills. Four of the lots received at least 20 bids, and the other had 70.

But only one successful bidder carried through and paid Ada County for the lot by Thursday’s deadline. It was for a 1.2-acre property at 143 N. Alto Via that sold for $28,100.

It was listed for a minimum bid of $6,597, which represented back taxes and fees owed on the property. The additional money will be returned to the owner of the property before it was seized.

The five lots were near homes that slid off their foundations during a slow-moving landslide three years ago. The damage caused roads to close, and large houses were ruled uninhabitable.

The property at 143 Alto Via was once assessed at $180,000, according to the Ada County Assessor’s Office. At the time of the landslide, it was assessed at $143,800.

Bidders did not have to put up a bond to guarantee payment, only a $285 registration fee. Under Idaho law, if a county is unable to sell a seized property at auction, it can sell it without further notice by public or private sale.

Editor’s note: This story has been corrected to say the lots that were auctioned off never had homes built on them.

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Maddie Capron is an intern with the Idaho Statesman, covering general news and features. She is a recent graduate of Ohio University and grew up in Ohio. Previously, she was an intern with the Ohio Center for Investigative Journalism, Garden Center and Cleveland Scene magazines.
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