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Idaho’s largest homebuilder just lost its Better Business Bureau accreditation

Corey Barton’s passion for building homes started with his mother

CBH Homes President Corey Barton is the biggest home builder in Idaho's Treasure Valley. He talks about his home building career and the construction boom in this 2018 interview.
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CBH Homes President Corey Barton is the biggest home builder in Idaho's Treasure Valley. He talks about his home building career and the construction boom in this 2018 interview.

The Better Business Bureau has revoked its accreditation of Boise-based homebuilder CBH Homes.

The Better Business Bureau said Thursday that it reached out to CBH 10 times with no response after a homeowner complained that the company, Idaho’s largest homebuilder, had failed to make repairs on her new home. CBH said late Thursday that it “dropped the ball” and is working to solve the problem.

After the company failed to address the complaint, the bureau’s board of directors for the Northwest and Pacific region decided that the company had failed to uphold the bureau’s standard to respond to all complaints received. It revoked CBH’s accreditation in late May.

“Anytime we get a complaint from a consumer we send it to a business,” said Rebecca Barr, a manager in Boise at the Better Business Bureau, which is a nonprofit consumer-protection group funded by member businesses. “We send it multiple times to a business. We want a response from the business, and we want to see the back-and-forth communication of them trying to resolve an issue. When a complaint is not answered, that’s when we really start to look at what’s going on.”

Holly Haener, CBH’s director of sales and marketing, emailed a statement late Thursday to the Idaho Statesman that said in part:

“We dropped the ball by not responding to the complaint on the BBB website, which also resulted in our score being dropped from its former A status to the current B- score. Once we became aware of the BBB revocation we began working with the BBB to quickly resolve the revocation.”

Homeowner Erin Dominguez filed the complaint that resulted in the revocation.

In February 2018, Dominguez bought a new home in Nampa from CBH for $265,000.

“My problems were immediate,” she told the Statesman in a phone interview. Her doorways were not square, causing the doors to fit incorrectly, and nails pushed out of the drywall, creating the appearance of “bumps and squares” throughout her house.

Even before she and her husband closed on the house, Dominguez said she asked the company to make repairs, but it did not. After nearly a year passed with no repairs, Dominguez worried that the items would not be fixed before her one-year warranty expired.

When a contractor did show up in the spring of this year, Dominguez said he got paint on her carpet and couch, she alleged in her complaint, which she filed in March 2019. She also said that the house’s carpet and cabinets have already grown worn-looking after just a year and half living there.

“Do I wish we had never bought a CBH home? Absolutely,” Dominguez said. “They lied and cheated us, and kept our money. I wish that they would come in and do things right.”

CBH said it has tried to make amends with Dominguez.

“We had been working diligently with this homeowner and had completed all warranty items as of May 2,” Haener wrote. “This homeowner has not logged any additional warranty requests.”

Over the last three years, CBH Homes has resolved 13 complaints received through the Better Business Bureau, including three from the last year.

Other complaints also describe problems with repairs and warranty claims, including faulty electrical systems, poorly installed siding and crooked interior walls.

CBH Homes, founded by Boise native Corey Barton, is the 37th largest home builder in the nation, according to Builder Magazine. Last year, CBH Homes closed on 1,348 houses and generated $371 million in revenue.

The Better Business Bureau provides ratings of all companies and logs customer complaints. A business can seek out Better Business Bureau accreditation if its want to bolster its reputation as a company that makes good-faith efforts to resolve customer complaints.

Businesses pay a fee for the organization to review their accreditation when they apply, and then annually after that.

CBH Homes was originally accredited by the Better Business Bureau in 1996. The company’s A rating is currently under review as well, Barr said. Bureau ratings range from A+ to F.

The Better Business Bureau has awarded other top home builders in the Treasure Valley A+ ratings and accreditation, including Toll Brothers, Biltmore Co., Hubble Homes, Brighton Homes and Boise Hunter Homes.

The organization’s board could choose to re-accredit CBH Homes if it demonstrates it has resolved Dominguez’s complaint.

“We want to be there for businesses that are doing good,” Barr said.

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