Business

This historic brick house in Downtown Boise weighs 300 tons. Crews will try to move it.

Time lapse of workers moving 214 E Jefferson house in Boise

Crews for Western States Movers of Nampa move the Fred Reiger House from 214 E. Jefferson St. to a lot at Avenue B and East Bannock Street, on Friday, August 17, 2018, as part of an expansion of St. Luke's Boise Medical Center.
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Crews for Western States Movers of Nampa move the Fred Reiger House from 214 E. Jefferson St. to a lot at Avenue B and East Bannock Street, on Friday, August 17, 2018, as part of an expansion of St. Luke's Boise Medical Center.

Update, 10:25 a.m. Monday, April 29: “The movers for the Bishop Foote Guest House were not prepared to complete the relocation as planned this past weekend, and so the relocation had to be temporarily delayed,” St. Luke’s Health System said in an email Monday. “As you can imagine, moving a 304-ton brick house is extremely complicated.” The new tentative moving dates are Saturday and Sunday, May 4 and 5.

A 300-ton brick home that once housed Idaho’s Episcopal bishop is scheduled to be moved as part of St. Luke’s Boise Medical Center’s expansion.

The 1935 Bishop Foote Guest House at 121 W. Jefferson St., has served since 1973 as a guest home for adult patients who don’t need hospitalization and their caregivers. It will join the Fred Reiger House at its new location at Avenue B and Bannock Street. The Reiger House was moved last year from 214 E. Jefferson St.

If all goes well, the Foote house will be moved off its foundation on Friday, April 26, and trucked down Jefferson toward 1st Street. It will be parked overnight on Jefferson, just west of 1st Street, and brought the next day to Avenue B.

The hospital is uncertain what it will do with the house at its new location. The guest house function will move to the Ronald McDonald House under construction at 139 E. Warm Springs Ave.

The two-story house with 40,000 square feet will be able to serve 47 families. It replaces a 14,000-square-foot house next door that can only serve 17 families.

The historic house was built in 1935 and has 4,000 square feet, St. Luke’s said in a news release. More than 100,000 people have stayed in the house since the hospital bought it for $22,000 in 1972 with money raised from donations.

The Rev. Norman Foote served as the bishop for the Episcopal Church in Idaho from 1957 to 1972. He served as president of the hospital’s board of director and was involved in the creation of St. Luke’s Mountain States Tumor Institute. During Foote’s tenure, St. Luke’s became a community-owned and operated hospital.

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Reporter John Sowell has worked for the Statesman since 2013. He covers business and growth issues. He grew up in Emmett and graduated from the University of Oregon.If you like seeing stories like this, please consider supporting our work with a digital subscription to the Idaho Statesman.
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