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Idaho's largest sequoia was uprooted, moved in Boise last June. It likes its new home

Tree expert says Boise sequoia is doing well after being moved last spring

David Cox, a tree expert with Environmental Design who has overseen the health of Boise's 104-year-old, 98-foot tall sequoia, paid a visit Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2017 to see how the tree is doing. Last spring the sequoia was moved from it's spot at S
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David Cox, a tree expert with Environmental Design who has overseen the health of Boise's 104-year-old, 98-foot tall sequoia, paid a visit Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2017 to see how the tree is doing. Last spring the sequoia was moved from it's spot at S

It was one of the biggest and most-watched transplant operations ever.

It was complicated and risky, and the move took four days.

Last June, a 98-foot giant sequoia on the grounds of St. Luke's Boise Medical Center was uprooted from where it had lived for more than a century — and moved two blocks to Fort Boise, a city park.

"One year after the world watched the historic tree roll down the street in an incredible preservation and relocation effort, the sequoia is thriving in its new home," St. Luke's officials said in a press release Monday.

Those who love the tree have been concerned about its health since the move. City Forester Brian Jorgenson, who checks on it weekly, says its doing well.

"I'm keeping a close eye on it," he said in the release.

David Cox of Texas-based Environmental Design, Inc. — the company that moved the tree — expects the tree to live another 300 to 500 years in the park. He believes it's a better location for the tree because there aren't any buildings near it that block the sun or funnel wind toward it.

The tree, known as the Pittenger sequoia, was originally planted in 1912 at the home of two doctors, Fred and Alice Pittenger. The tree cutting was a gift to Fred Pittenger by the conservationist Emil Grandjean, one of Idaho’s first foresters.

The hospital grew around the tree, and new development necessitated the tree be removed. Rather than cut it down, St. Luke's gifted the live tree to the city.

Katy Moeller: 208-377-6413

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