In this file photo taken after Charles Fain was released from prison in 2001 after wrongly serving 18 years for the murder and sexual assault of a 9-year-old Nampa girl in 1982, Fain was doing his job at one of the employers who offered him work following his release when new DNA evidence refuted earlier physical evidence used in his conviction. Greg Hampikian, who directs the Idaho Innocence Project, argues that Fain should be compensated by the State of Idaho for his time served.
In this file photo taken after Charles Fain was released from prison in 2001 after wrongly serving 18 years for the murder and sexual assault of a 9-year-old Nampa girl in 1982, Fain was doing his job at one of the employers who offered him work following his release when new DNA evidence refuted earlier physical evidence used in his conviction. Greg Hampikian, who directs the Idaho Innocence Project, argues that Fain should be compensated by the State of Idaho for his time served. Joe Estrella
In this file photo taken after Charles Fain was released from prison in 2001 after wrongly serving 18 years for the murder and sexual assault of a 9-year-old Nampa girl in 1982, Fain was doing his job at one of the employers who offered him work following his release when new DNA evidence refuted earlier physical evidence used in his conviction. Greg Hampikian, who directs the Idaho Innocence Project, argues that Fain should be compensated by the State of Idaho for his time served. Joe Estrella

Wrongly convicted of 1982 murder, Idaho exoneree deserves compensation

January 07, 2017 11:36 PM

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