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Senate votes to end government shutdown 2:51

Senate votes to end government shutdown

'No workplace is immune' to harassment, says former state worker behind tort claim 2:33

'No workplace is immune' to harassment, says former state worker behind tort claim

99 bottles of beer on the wall is easy. This Eagle man has 11,000 cans in his garage 1:03

99 bottles of beer on the wall is easy. This Eagle man has 11,000 cans in his garage

St. Luke's uses 'friendly, four-legged' staff to calm upset patients 0:32

St. Luke's uses 'friendly, four-legged' staff to calm upset patients

First Mexican bakery opens in Boise 1:47

First Mexican bakery opens in Boise

Albertsons CEO says treating people right is the key to success 2:40

Albertsons CEO says treating people right is the key to success

New ad targets Idaho's Raúl Labrador over tax reform 0:31

New ad targets Idaho's Raúl Labrador over tax reform

From Kansas to Trump's voter commission: Who is Kris Kobach? 2:58

From Kansas to Trump's voter commission: Who is Kris Kobach?

Albertsons opens new convenience store. 1:25

Albertsons opens new convenience store.

Yantis death: Idaho State Police dashcam provides details on shooting 3:23

Yantis death: Idaho State Police dashcam provides details on shooting

  • Russ Fulcher explains his qualifications for Idaho governor

    Former gubernatorial candidate and State Sen. Russ Fulcher, R-Meridian, announced in fall 2016 his campaign for Idaho governor in 2018. He said he wanted to remind Idahoans that life, even politics, can be good again, despite the nasty rhetoric that dominates national campaigns.

Former gubernatorial candidate and State Sen. Russ Fulcher, R-Meridian, announced in fall 2016 his campaign for Idaho governor in 2018. He said he wanted to remind Idahoans that life, even politics, can be good again, despite the nasty rhetoric that dominates national campaigns. Provided by Russ Fulcher
Former gubernatorial candidate and State Sen. Russ Fulcher, R-Meridian, announced in fall 2016 his campaign for Idaho governor in 2018. He said he wanted to remind Idahoans that life, even politics, can be good again, despite the nasty rhetoric that dominates national campaigns. Provided by Russ Fulcher

Fulcher announces he’ll run for governor again in 2018

August 24, 2016 04:17 PM

More Videos

Senate votes to end government shutdown 2:51

Senate votes to end government shutdown

'No workplace is immune' to harassment, says former state worker behind tort claim 2:33

'No workplace is immune' to harassment, says former state worker behind tort claim

99 bottles of beer on the wall is easy. This Eagle man has 11,000 cans in his garage 1:03

99 bottles of beer on the wall is easy. This Eagle man has 11,000 cans in his garage

St. Luke's uses 'friendly, four-legged' staff to calm upset patients 0:32

St. Luke's uses 'friendly, four-legged' staff to calm upset patients

First Mexican bakery opens in Boise 1:47

First Mexican bakery opens in Boise

Albertsons CEO says treating people right is the key to success 2:40

Albertsons CEO says treating people right is the key to success

New ad targets Idaho's Raúl Labrador over tax reform 0:31

New ad targets Idaho's Raúl Labrador over tax reform

From Kansas to Trump's voter commission: Who is Kris Kobach? 2:58

From Kansas to Trump's voter commission: Who is Kris Kobach?

Albertsons opens new convenience store. 1:25

Albertsons opens new convenience store.

Yantis death: Idaho State Police dashcam provides details on shooting 3:23

Yantis death: Idaho State Police dashcam provides details on shooting

  • 'No workplace is immune' to harassment, says former state worker behind tort claim

    Lourdes Matsumoto says she was subjected to a variety of sexual and racial harassment and other concerning behavior by a supervisor at the Idaho State Controller's Office. Dec. 8, 2017, a day after announcing her claim against the state was settled, she spoke about the bigger picture of sexual harassment across the country and about the #metoo movement. "I think it's really important that employers do the right thing, and they take employee reports seriously and do honest investigations and really look at what's in the best interests of protecting their employees when it comes to harassment and discrimination."