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  • Man's graffiti targets refugee's business. Supporters fight his chalk with their own.

    When Crystal Rose heard July 14, 2017 about anti-refugee graffiti at Boise's The Goodness Land restaurant, she and her young daughter, Ember, hurried over there to write a positive message in chalk. Many other Boiseans showed up to show support for the Iraqi refugee who owns the eatery and counter the hateful rhetoric.

When Crystal Rose heard July 14, 2017 about anti-refugee graffiti at Boise's The Goodness Land restaurant, she and her young daughter, Ember, hurried over there to write a positive message in chalk. Many other Boiseans showed up to show support for the Iraqi refugee who owns the eatery and counter the hateful rhetoric. Kristin Rodine krodine@idahostatesman.com
When Crystal Rose heard July 14, 2017 about anti-refugee graffiti at Boise's The Goodness Land restaurant, she and her young daughter, Ember, hurried over there to write a positive message in chalk. Many other Boiseans showed up to show support for the Iraqi refugee who owns the eatery and counter the hateful rhetoric. Kristin Rodine krodine@idahostatesman.com

2 days earlier, there was a swastika. Now, chalk spells out ‘love’ and ‘unity’

July 14, 2017 04:19 PM

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  • Boise's MLK march is for remembering — and for action

    Hundreds of people walked from Boise State's Student Union Building to the Capitol in in the MLK Day of Greatness March and Rally. The annual event is organized by BSU's Living Legacy Committee.