“No matter the size of the media organization, the public is counting on us to do this work,” said Les Zaitz, publisher and editor of The Malheur Enterprise in Vale, Ore. “The reaction in this community has been so strong and so sustained, it convinced me of what I’ve long suspected: Despite about what everyone says about news and the media dying, people want news and information they can trust.”
“No matter the size of the media organization, the public is counting on us to do this work,” said Les Zaitz, publisher and editor of The Malheur Enterprise in Vale, Ore. “The reaction in this community has been so strong and so sustained, it convinced me of what I’ve long suspected: Despite about what everyone says about news and the media dying, people want news and information they can trust.” Photo by Mike Zacchino / Provided by Les Zaitz
“No matter the size of the media organization, the public is counting on us to do this work,” said Les Zaitz, publisher and editor of The Malheur Enterprise in Vale, Ore. “The reaction in this community has been so strong and so sustained, it convinced me of what I’ve long suspected: Despite about what everyone says about news and the media dying, people want news and information they can trust.” Photo by Mike Zacchino / Provided by Les Zaitz

Chasing retirement, newsman-rancher takes on state government — and wins

April 13, 2017 4:30 PM