Boise State Basketball

Mountain West supports call from Colorado State basketball game; Boise State coach unconvinced

See James Webb's disputed buzzer-beater against Colorado State

The Boise State men's basketball team thought a 3-pointer by junior forward Webb had won them the game. But officials later ruled it invalid, and BSU went on to lose 97-93 in double overtime.
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The Boise State men's basketball team thought a 3-pointer by junior forward Webb had won them the game. But officials later ruled it invalid, and BSU went on to lose 97-93 in double overtime.

It has become college basketball’s Zapruder film, one second of footage reviewed over and over, yet still leaving so many questions.

The final shot of the first overtime Wednesday between Boise State and Colorado State created the controversy, which gained steam in the 24 hours after James Webb III hit what appeared to be a game-winning 3-pointer. The waved-off shot meant a second overtime, where the Broncos eventually lost 97-93.

After the game, official David Hall said upon review, it took Webb 1.2 or 1.3 seconds to get off his shot, which began with 0.8 seconds remaining from an inbound pass from Anthony Drmic. ESPN determined it took 0.63 seconds using its own measurement, Deadspin.com said it took 0.57 seconds.

The Mountain West supported Hall’s ruling Thursday afternoon, even sending out a video that may work against the league. In the video, a timer used by game officials in the review process ran twice as fast as the game clock at Moby Arena.

“There’s some new video evidence ... that I’m still gathering in and processing,” Boise State coach Leon Rice said. “I don’t claim to be an expert on any of it. All I can say is from where I stood, I thought it was good.”

The final shot was discussed on ESPN shows, including SportsCenter, Around The Horn and Pardon The Interruption. Former Virginia Tech coach and current ESPN analyst Seth Greenberg said he “would’ve had an out of body experience” if he were Rice, commending the Broncos’ coach for keeping his cool.

Minutes after the game in Fort Collins, Rice had dozens of texts from friends and fellow coaches sympathizing with him.

“That’s been exhausting, all the emotions of this thing,” Rice said.

After it issued its statement Thursday afternoon, the Mountain West said it was aware of the possible issue of the incorrect clock on the officials’ video, but had not commented further. Rice is holding out hope that a win could be given retroactively. A more likely scenario is acknowledgment of the error, but not changing the result.

“That would be devastating. That’s almost like dying another death,” Rice said. “... I want it right, and those officials want it right. That would be devastating for them, I would hope. They’d feel awful if they were given the wrong information. That’s egregious.”

Rice said an official told him during the review they would take as long as needed to get the call right, to which Rice wondered Thursday: “Does that mean today, the day after? I don’t know.”

He also noted that when Boise State got the ball with 0.8 seconds left, it was preceded by a Colorado State turnover that seemed to occur with a little more than a second remaining, but was not reviewed.

“It’s an interesting can of worms, because how can you time the last possession on video and are so precise, quote unquote ... but the possession before, why does that time not matter?” Rice said. “I think we’re opening a can of worms in college basketball that better be fixed, or you might have a lot of these kind of situations.”

Dave Southorn: 208-377-6420, @IDS_Southorn

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Wyoming (12-13, 5-7 MW) at Boise State (16-9, 7-5), 2 p.m. Saturday (CBS Sports Network, 670 AM)

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