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Ammon Bundy says FBI has reversed its decision after background check, OKs his AR-15 purchase

Ammon Bundy says FBI has reversed its decision to deny his AR-15 purchase

On Aug. 31, 2019, Ammon Bundy failed a federally required background check to purchase a firearm at an Emmett, Idaho, sporting goods store. Three days later, Bundy says the FBI changed its mind and OK'd his background check.
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On Aug. 31, 2019, Ammon Bundy failed a federally required background check to purchase a firearm at an Emmett, Idaho, sporting goods store. Three days later, Bundy says the FBI changed its mind and OK'd his background check.

The FBI apparently has changed its mind and decided to approve Ammon Bundy’s purchase of firearm after initially denying the sale after a background check, according to Bundy.

On Aug. 31, Bundy failed a federal background check to purchase an AR-15 rifle at D&B Supply in Emmett.

Bundy recorded on video the attempted purchase and posted it to social media.

Bundy, who led an armed takeover of a federal wildlife refuge in Oregon in 2016 and participated in a federal standoff at his family’s ranch in Nevada in 2014, was charged with numerous felonies, but was never convicted.

On Wednesday morning, Bundy posted a new video to social media in which he replays a voice message he received from a D&B Supply employee.

“I just want to let you know that we received a call from NICS today and they overturned your original results, so it is now a ‘proceed.’ You are welcome to stop in and pick up that rifle anytime you like,” states the message.

The message did not state why the FBI decided to approve the background check, and it is unclear why Bundy initially failed the background check. The store told Bundy it does not have that information.

The Statesman contacted D&B Supply to confirm the recording and was told the store could not release any information pertaining to federal background checks.

“I don’t know exactly what to think about that,” Bundy said in the video about the FBI’s reversal. “I don’t know whether to celebrate or to be really concerned.”

Bundy continued, “If someone in the FBI is trying to do the right thing, then I am grateful for that. ... but are they just making a tactical move to make it so that I do not have any standing in the courts, so that I cannot go and sue them because now they overturned it really quick and now, according to their rules, I can go purchase gun and so I have no standing to sue them?”

Bundy told the Statesman on Wednesday he is not sure if he will buy the rifle because people have given him parts to build his own AR-15.

“I may go that route and not purchase one at a federal control facility,” he said.

Bundy said Tuesday he is concerned about the integrity of the federal background check system when it denies someone who has no felony convictions.

According to a U.S. Government Accountability Office report, in 2017, NICS processed 8.6 million background checks. Of those, just 112,090 were denied.

Bundy told the Statesman this is the first time he has tried to purchase a firearm since he was released from federal custody in January 2018.

When federal authorities arrested Bundy in Oregon, they seized any property he had with him, including his wedding ring and several firearms. Bundy said even though the trials have ended with no convictions, those items have not been returned to him, which, in part, is why he went to purchase a semi-automatic rifle on Saturday.

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Idaho Statesman investigative reporter Cynthia Sewell was named Idaho Press Club reporter of the year in 2017 and 2008. A University of Oregon graduate, she joined the Statesman in 2005. Her family has lived in Idaho since the mid-1800s.
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