Idaho

Idaho’s third crisis center opens in time for holidays

In this 2014 photo, Brenda Price shows the progress of the Behavioral Health Community Crisis Center of East Idaho before it opened its doors on Dec. 4, 2014.
In this 2014 photo, Brenda Price shows the progress of the Behavioral Health Community Crisis Center of East Idaho before it opened its doors on Dec. 4, 2014. Post Register

The third state-funded behavioral health crisis center opened its doors in south-central Idaho this week, according to the Times-News.

“The holiday season is when we start to see people having crises, whether people are having depression alone or because of a family fight,” South Central Public Health District spokesman Jeff Pierson told the Times-News.

Lawmakers approved allocating state dollars to the Twin Falls center during this year’s legislative session. A fourth crisis center is slated to open in the Boise area.

Related story: Idaho crisis center’s first-year savings ‘astounding’

The centers are open 24 hours a day, every day. They provide temporary services to people having mental health or substance abuse crises. Because they are crisis centers instead of longer-term treatment facilities, patients can stay up to 23 hours and 59 minutes during a visit. Officials say the centers provide somewhere to go other than jail or a hospital. All services are provided for free, and no one is turned away.

Eastern Idaho got a state-funded center in 2014 in Idaho Falls. Coeur d’Alene opened a crisis center for northern Idaho in 2015.

The Twin Falls center has 20 employees, including health care providers and security personnel, the newspaper reported. The subcontractor for the center is ProActive Advantage, the Times-News said.

Audrey Dutton: 208-377-6448, @IDS_Audrey

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