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'Get your drugs and get out': Grandmom is armed — and tired of dealers selling Spice

Jonnie McIntosh, a 70-year-old grandmom from Indianapolis, Indiana, said she is armed with a loaded gun to fight off drug dealers after her son overdosed on fake weed called spice and her pregnant granddaughter was murdered in a deal gone bad.
Jonnie McIntosh, a 70-year-old grandmom from Indianapolis, Indiana, said she is armed with a loaded gun to fight off drug dealers after her son overdosed on fake weed called spice and her pregnant granddaughter was murdered in a deal gone bad. Screenshot from Fox59

Her grandson recently overdosed on synthetic "marijuana" called Spice, Jonnie McIntosh said, and her pregnant granddaughter was killed last year "over a drug deal."

So the 70-year-old woman from Indianapolis, Indiana, told Fox59 that she's had enough — and is armed with a loaded Glock to prove it.

“It is loaded," she said in an interview with the TV station. "Get your drugs and get out of my neighborhood."

The fed up septuagenarian said she was recently held at gunpoint by an unknown man and woman who said her grandson owed them $20 for Spice, the same drug that caused him to overdose. She told WISH-TV that she went back inside her house, which the pair "threatened to shoot up," but she didn't come back with any money.

“I went inside and grabbed the gun,” McIntosh said. She added that she and the would-be robbers had a stand-off before they ran away.

McIntosh doesn't like guns, she told WISH-TV, but she knew she needed something to ward off Spice dealers that hang around her neighborhood. So she said she decided that "I got to give in to something I don't want to" and will apply for a concealed carry permit.

Synthetic "marijuana" — referred to as "Spice," "K2" and "Mind Trip" — was first sold in the U.S. in 2008, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and poison centers received 7,794 calls from people who took the drug in 2015.

In July, over 100 people overdosed on so-called synthetic pot in a Pennsylvania county over the span of just three days, CNN reported, but no one died. And in March 2018, dozens of people in Illinois were hospitalized for symptoms like excessive bleeding after they took the drug, according to The Chicago Tribune. Many of those victims bled from their eyes and ears, state officials say, and at least two people died after taking Spice.

A test found a rat poison ingredient inside that Illinois batch of Spice, police say, and three Chicago convenience store workers were arrested.

The Illinois Department of Public Health warned that the effects of Spice “are not safe and may affect the brain much more powerfully than marijuana,” according to Fox32. The risk that comes with taking Spice is compounded by the fact that it is “not one drug, but hundreds of different chemicals manufactured and sold,” the Illinois Department of Public health wrote.

Spice has affected McIntosh's area pretty hard as well. The Indianapolis Metropolitan Police told RTV6 that 14 people overdosed on Spice in one day earlier this month in downtown Indianapolis — and two dozen overdosed on the drug within one day back in February.

The grandmother told Fox59 that she views Spice as particularly dangerous.

“Back in my day, it was marijuana and Boones Farm wine," she said. "That is all my parents had to worry about. This stuff has bug spray in it and all kinds of chemicals. Whatever they decide to spray on it. Any way that they can get high."

And if she sees any Spice dealers roaming around her neighborhood who mean her harm?

"I don't know what else to do other than shoot because 911 can't get here quick enough," she told WISH-TV. "I mean it just takes a split second."

At border towns, cartel drug smugglers are limited only by their imaginations, hiding drugs in, among other places, secret compartments within their vehicles.

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