Fires

Rain, cooler weather slows Pioneer Fire

The Pioneer Fire burns toward a scarred area from a previous fire, in a photo provided by the U.S. Forest Service.
The Pioneer Fire burns toward a scarred area from a previous fire, in a photo provided by the U.S. Forest Service.

Temperatures dipped into the 30s and 40s early Monday in the Lowman area and were accompanied by rain, helping firefighters battling the Pioneer Fire.

The fire’s southern half, primarily below Banks-Lowman Road, was affected the most by the changing weather conditions. About .014 inch of rain fell around Charlotte Gulch.

Firefighters worked Monday to advance efforts north of Banks-Lowman Road. Crews worked to push the fire into a scarred area of the 2006 Sheep Trail fire to keep the blaze south of Forest Service Road 579. They also worked to protect summer homes in the Clear Creek/Long Creek area.

The fire grew 80 acres since Sunday and has now burned 181,145 acres, according to the Forest Service. A total of 1,087 firefighters are working on the fire, which is 55 percent contained.

Smoke continues to drift through Garden Valley, Lowman, Stanley and other surrounding areas.

The following evacuation levels remain in place: Level 2 (be set to leave) for seasonal homes located near Clear Creek; Level 1 (be ready to leave) for Pioneerville and Lowman; and Level 1 for structures in the South Fork Road area, east of Grimes Creek, and along the South Fork Payette River.

A temporary flight restriction is in place over the fire area. Private and commercial aircraft, as well as privately owned drones, are prohibited from entering restricted airspace.

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