Crime

Convicted Idaho murderer awaiting new trial arrested in Star incident

Jaime Charboneau, a convicted murderer, has been ordered to serve 25 years in prison for burglary and aggravated assault with a deadly weapon for breaking into a Star woman’s home with a weapon.
Jaime Charboneau, a convicted murderer, has been ordered to serve 25 years in prison for burglary and aggravated assault with a deadly weapon for breaking into a Star woman’s home with a weapon. Courtesy of the Ada County Jail

A Star resident reported returning home Monday afternoon to find Jaimi Dean Charboneau hiding in her closet.

The woman, who resides in the 12600 block of West Gambrell Street, said Charboneau, whom she knows, threatened her with a gun. The woman said she ran out of her home, went to a neighbor’s house and called 911 at about 1:20 p.m.

A few minutes later, Charboneau, 56, of Boise, called Ada County police dispatch and said he had been held hostage by the woman at the Bambrell Street home. He told deputies he escaped from the house and drove to a parking lot at the intersection of West Chinden Boulevard and Linder Road, where he said he called police.

Deputies spoke to Charboneau at that location. He was later arrested and taken to the Ada County Jail in Boise, where he was charged with aggravated battery with a deadly weapon and burglary.

He is scheduled to appear for a video arraignment Tuesday afternoon in Ada County Magistrate Court.

Last May, Charboneau was released from prison after a judge vacated his 1985 conviction for killing of Marilyn Arbaugh, his ex-wife, in Jerome County. She was shot 16 times with a rifle. Charboneau, who was 25 at the time, said he killed Arbaugh, 36, in self-defense.

Fifth District Judge Robert Elgee ruled that Charboneau was entitled to a new trial based on new evidence that surfaced in 2011. A letter written in 1989 by a daughter of Arbaugh, who later died, wasn’t revealed to Charboneau for more than 20 years. In the letter, Tira Arbaugh said prosecutors told her to lie about what happened the day her mother was killed and to conceal evidence in the case.

While members of Arbaugh’s family claimed the letter was forged, Elgee and the Idaho Attorney General’s Office found the letter was authentic.

Charboneau sought a new trial in 2011, after becoming aware of the letter.

Charboneau was originally sentenced to death but following an appeal was given life without the possibility of parole.

Arbaugh was shot by Charboneau in two separate incidents, once in August 1983, two months after the couple was married. Charboneau was charged with aggrevated battery in that case, but it was later dismissed.

Arbaugh obtained a divorce in June 1984, but she and Charboneau continued to see one another. Later that month, she reported being kidnapped and raped by Charboneau and he was arrested.

On June 28, 1984, Charboneau bought a .22-caliber rifle from a store in Gooding and allegedly shot Arbaugh in a corral near her home. The couple’s daughter, Tiffnie, heard shots and found her mom in a barn covered with blood, according to an earlier Idaho Supreme Court review of Charboneau’s conviction. Charboneau was standing near his ex-wife, with the rifle pointed at her. She later died.

John Sowell: 208-377-6423, @IDS_Sowell

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