Crime

Aryan Knights, Severely Violent Criminals gang members indicted on drug, gun charges

Idaho street gang members arrested on drug trafficking and other charges

A federal grand jury has indicted 13 people — including members of the Aryan Knights and Severely Violent Criminals gangs — for drug distribution, conspiracy, unlawful possession of firearms and other crimes.
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A federal grand jury has indicted 13 people — including members of the Aryan Knights and Severely Violent Criminals gangs — for drug distribution, conspiracy, unlawful possession of firearms and other crimes.

A federal grand jury indicted 13 people — including members of the Aryan Knights and Severely Violent Criminals gangs — for drug distribution, conspiracy, unlawful possession of firearms and other crimes, according to U.S. Attorney Bart Davis.

Of the 13 people indicted, 11 face drug charges, including 13 counts of distribution of methamphetamine and three counts of conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine. Two people were indicted on gun charges, including three counts of unlawful possession of a firearm.

“These gang members and their associates were operating primarily in Ada County, with some activity in Canyon County,” Davis said.

Davis outlined the charges at a news conference Thursday morning.

The indicted defendants are:

  • Tyler James Campbell, 34, of Boise.
  • Jesse Everett Ford, 43, of Kuna.
  • Brian Cade Humphreys, 45, of Meridian.
  • Jeremy Caine Lyons, 40, of Meridian.
  • Jason Schepers, 33, of Caldwell.
  • Kirstin Decker (aka Kirstin Walz), 39, of Boise.
  • Jennifer Lee Sayer, 34, of Boise.
  • Kimberly Ann Hale, 39, of Meridian.
  • John Alan Redfern, 48, of Boise.
  • Frank Lee Gorrell, 40, of Boise.
  • Angela Marie Shelton (aka Angela Marie Junkert), 43, of Boise.
  • Keith Anthony Murphy, 28, of Boise.
  • Cameron James Ball, 31, of Boise.

All were indicted July 10.

“Every available resource and every available tool to take down the violent gangs and drug traffickers that damage our communities is used to make and keep them safe,” Davis said.

Campbell, Ford, Sayer, Hale, Gorrell and Ball are in custody at the Ada County Jail. Lyons is in custody in Kootenai County. Decker and Murphy are in the custody of the Idaho Department of Correction. Three of the remaining four defendants were arrested Wednesday night and Thursday morning.

Redfern remains at large.

Because some of the indictments are federal charges, those suspects would be sent to federal prison if they are convicted.

Davis noted that putting someone in a federal prison puts less strain on Idaho prisons, but that was not the specific reason those defendants were charged at the federal level.

FBI Agent Doug Hart said the gangs’ membership is fluid, and they are adding members. While this investigation took about six months, those gangs have been in place for several years, he said. At least two of the people charged are currently in state prison.

“Oftentimes the members of these gangs are in and out of prison as if in a revolving door,” Hart said. “So the fact that some of these people are in the Department of Correction (now), they were not at the time of the investigation.”

Boise Police Chief Bill Bones warned that law enforcement in the Treasure Valley will not tolerate gang violence and drug trafficking, and the recent indictment is proof.

“I am here to tell you today that bad people have been removed from the street,” Bones said. “(They’re) people that are a danger to other people in this community.”

Canyon County Sheriff Kieran Donahue reiterated Bones’ warning to criminals, saying law enforcement will remain vigilant in fighting gang activity.

“We will investigate you, we will identify you, we will prosecute you and we will put you in prison — period,” Donahue said. “That is for the safety of our citizens, who absolutely deserve it.”

Federal drug trafficking charges are generally punishable by up to 20 years in prison, a fine of $1 million and at least three years of supervised release. When the defendants are charged with distributing methamphetamine, or conspiring to do so, they face a minimum term of five years and up to 40 years in prison, a fine up to $5 million, and at least four years of supervised release.

Defendants charged with distributing more than 50 grams of pure methamphetamine, or conspiring to do so, face a minimum term of 10 years and up to life in prison, a fine up to $10 million, and at least five years of supervised release.

“I am confident with these arrests our streets, our communities and our state are safer,” Davis said. “I am also confident these gang street operations are substantially weakened.”

The charges stem from an investigation by the Treasure Valley Metro Violent Crimes Task Force. The charges are being prosecuted by the special assistant U.S. attorney hired by the Treasure Valley Partnership, the Canyon County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office and the state of Idaho to address gang crimes.

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