West Ada

Man saw fatal shootout - and rushed to help injured Meridian police officer

On July 1, 2018, Nedim Cavcic, far left, helped comfort Meridian Police Officer Kyle Mikowski, third from left, after Mikowski was shot in a confrontation with a state parole fugitive. The pair first met one month earlier when Cavcic and his son, Eldin, brought a box of doughnuts to the Meridian Police Department as a surprise for the officers. This photo was taken that day. "Officer Mikowski and (Officer Trevor Weitzel) came out and just made Eldin's day," Cavcic wrote in a Facebook post. "They joked around with him, gave him stickers and his own badge."
On July 1, 2018, Nedim Cavcic, far left, helped comfort Meridian Police Officer Kyle Mikowski, third from left, after Mikowski was shot in a confrontation with a state parole fugitive. The pair first met one month earlier when Cavcic and his son, Eldin, brought a box of doughnuts to the Meridian Police Department as a surprise for the officers. This photo was taken that day. "Officer Mikowski and (Officer Trevor Weitzel) came out and just made Eldin's day," Cavcic wrote in a Facebook post. "They joked around with him, gave him stickers and his own badge."

A Meridian police officer shot twice on Sunday afternoon was quickly helped by two members of the public — one who called for help, and another who comforted and kept him talking while waiting for emergency personnel to arrive.

Nedim Cavcic, owner of E&E Construction of Boise, had clamped off some cabinets inside a house on South Cressida Place — near Maple Grove and Overland roads. Cavcic said he had stepped outside to wait for the adhesive to bond when he heard a man yell out, "No. Let me go. Don't."

Cavcic, 29, thought it was neighbors arguing. But then the voice got louder, he said, and he saw a man run across the street followed by a police officer.

The officer, later identified as Kyle Mikowski, told the man to get on the ground or he was going to use a stun gun on him, Cavcic said. The man didn't listen, Cavcic said, and Mikowski pulled out his stun gun and shot him.

"As the guy was falling to the ground, I can't even describe how fast he pulled the gun out and started firing at the officer," Cavcic said. He estimated the man shot at Mikowski five or six times, hitting the officer in the legs.

Mikowski returned fire. Cavcic believed he fired eight or nine shots. The two men were about seven feet apart, and 25 feet from where Cavcic stood, watching.

Daniel Norris.jpg
Crime Stoppers provided this photo of Daniel Isaiah Norris to southwest Idaho news media on June 27, 2018.

After it was clear the man, later identified as Daniel Isaiah Norris of Meridian, was dead, Cavcic went over and moved the gun away from the body. He then turned his attention to the wounded officer, he said.

He told a neighbor standing outside his garage to call 911 and let a dispatcher know an officer was down.

He went to Mikowski, took off his shirt and placed it under the officer's head. He then told Mikowski to grab his hand as they waited for police and paramedics to arrive, he said.

"I kept telling him he was going to be OK and that help was on the way," Cavcic said.

The first police officer who arrived brought out bands to stem the bleeding from Mikowski's legs. Cavcic said he helped the new officer elevate Mikowski's legs to slow the blood flow.

Mikowski still had ahold of Cavcic's hand as paramedics put him on a stretcher and lifted him into an ambulance, Cavcic said.

"I was just glad I was there to help," he said.

It wasn't until Mikowski was on the stretcher and Cavcic was able to look at his face and name tag that Cavcic realized he had met the officer before. About a month ago, Cavcic's 5-year-old son, Eldin, said he wanted to take a box of doughnuts to the police.

They were in Meridian, so they drove to the Meridian Police Department and Mikowski and Officer Trevor Weitzel came out to accept the box of doughnuts. Cavcic said the officers joked with his son and gave him a sticker badge.

"Eldin was smiles all day," Cavcic wrote Sunday on Facebook about the visit.

Mikowski has worked for MPD for about 1 1/2 years and had about 8 1/2 years of law enforcement experience elsewhere, an agency news release said Monday.

He is "recovering well," the department said, released from the hospital Monday after surgery to remove bullets from his leg and to stop bleeding.

Meridian officials including Police Chief Jeff Lavey, Mayor Tammy de Weerd and Councilman Treg Bernt praised Cavcic on his Facebook post for his efforts.

"Thank you for being there for him today," Lavey wrote. "He was in good spirits when I left him (Sunday) evening. So grateful for your support and his outcome."

De Weerd wrote: "Our community will be forever grateful for the role you played today!"

And Bernt wrote that Cavcic was there for a reason.

"(I) would love to shake your hand and give you a hug for your brave service," Bernt wrote.

In a news release, MPD gave "thanks and gratitude to the two (2) citizens who came to the aid of our officer. This is just one of the many reasons we love the Treasure Valley. The partnership between our police and the citizens we serve is like no other."

Cavcic said he doesn't feel like a hero. He said he simply did what he hopes anyone else would do if they were in the same situation.

"Officer Mikowski was the only hero there," Cavcic said. "Despite being injured, he was still concerned for my safety."

Investigation continues

Notice went out to local media Wednesday that Idaho Department of Correction had put Norris, 33, on its most wanted list for a parole violation.

Four days later, on July 1, Mikowski shot and killed Norris during their confrontation. Norris, 33, "died of multiple gunshot wounds after an altercation with law enforcement," the Ada County Coroner's Office said Monday afternoon.

In 2004, Norris was sent to prison for robbery. It is not immediately known when he was released.

In February 2016, he pleaded guilty to solicitation of kidnapping in the second degree. It is not immediately clear if he received a prison sentence. According to Idaho Department of Correction records, he was on parole was through July 22, 2024.

Officers were looking for a person with an outstanding felony warrant when they found Norris and two other people, police said. The others, a man and a woman, fled after the shooting in a Dodge Durango. The pair later dumped the Durango at a Suds City car wash at Maple Grove and Overland and fled in a gold SUV, police said.

The second man turned himself in Sunday evening on an unrelated warrant, police said. The man, who has not been publicly identified, was not charged in Sunday's incident and is considered a witness, Deputy Chief Tracy Basterrechea said.

The woman was still at large Monday. She was described as Hispanic with black hair and wearing a gray tank top.

Officers were looking for an individual with an outstanding felony warrant when they located the suspects, who fled on foot. Officers pursued on foot, and one suspect opened fire on police, said Meridian Police Chief Jeff Lavey.

John Sowell: 208-377-6423, @JohnWSowell. Cynthia Sewell contributed.
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