Canyon County

Nampa firefighters rescue ducklings from storm drains

The crew from Nampa Fire Department Station 2 rescued several ducklings Sunday. Here, firefighter Kiley Rand, bids one of the rescued ducklings good luck before bringing it back to its mother.
The crew from Nampa Fire Department Station 2 rescued several ducklings Sunday. Here, firefighter Kiley Rand, bids one of the rescued ducklings good luck before bringing it back to its mother.

Nine ducklings were reunited with their mothers thanks to Nampa firefighters and residents Sunday.

This time of year small, young ducklings are at risk of slipping into storm drains and getting separated from their mother.

But, several ducklings had luck on their side with the help of concerned citizens and Nampa Fire Department, Station 2.

The first call came in around 10 a.m. Two children, between the ages of 4 and 6, heard several ducklings crying out and saw their distressed mother circling a storm drain near 12th Avenue South and West Greenhurst Road. The children and their dad reached out to the fire department.

Step-up Cpt. David Cooksey said the crew from Station 2 responded and had to MacGyver their way to a rescue solution. The drain was deep and the ducklings hard to reach.

So, firefighters hooked up a traffic cone to a pole to create a scoop with reach. Then they lowered it into the drain and started pulling ducklings out. Firefighters rescued six ducklings from that drain and returned them to their mother who was waiting around anxiously.

But, the Station 2 crew wasn’t done yet.

They got a call around noon to the area of Sunnybrook Drive and Hillcrest Way for another rescue. This time residents had tried to get four ducklings out themselves, but were only able to return two to their mother. Unfortunately, one was taken by a hawk, Cooksey said. And one more was trapped, hidden from view in the storm drain.

With their traffic-cone-duckling scoop in tow, the crew rushed to the scene to find the last duckling.

But, even they had a difficult time finding the last baby bird.

Crewmembers pulled up a video app on their phone, found duck calls and played the sound next to the storm drain. That brought the duckling out into view so firefighters could lower their traffic cone into the storm drain and pull the little guy out. The duckling’s mother had wandered off to a nearby pond with the duck’s two remaining siblings. Then the residents picked the duckling up and reunited it with its family, Cooksey said.

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