Boise & Garden City

Boise council to look at Highlands Cove transportation plan

A view of the east end of the Crane Creek Golf Course, looking north toward the end of Chardie Road and a cluster of homes around Chardie Court, which ends in a cul-de-sac. Developers Chris Conner and Dave Yorgason plan to build 57 homes on 54 acres wrapping around this part of the golf course. Their subdivision would include homes on an extended Chardie Road east of Chardie Court and more homes on the east and south sides of the golf course.
A view of the east end of the Crane Creek Golf Course, looking north toward the end of Chardie Road and a cluster of homes around Chardie Court, which ends in a cul-de-sac. Developers Chris Conner and Dave Yorgason plan to build 57 homes on 54 acres wrapping around this part of the golf course. Their subdivision would include homes on an extended Chardie Road east of Chardie Court and more homes on the east and south sides of the golf course.

While a court battle brews over the Boise City Council's approval of the 57-home Highlands Cove development, city planners are working through developers Dave Yorgason's and Chris Conner's plan for new and extended roads to access the homes in the project's first phase.

The council is scheduled to take a look at the plan Tuesday. The biggest change to the road network is a proposal to extend Highland View Drive around the east end of the Crane Creek golf course and connect it to Braemere Road to the north. A new road, Broadstone Court, would extend west of Highland View Drive and end in a cul-de-sac.

After hours of testimony and months of controversy, the council approved Highlands Cove in December. People who already live in the area around the golf course protested vehemently and now are asking a judge to take the rare step of overturning the council's decision.

Traffic is their central concern. The existing neighborhood's roads have no sidewalks and are already too narrow for comfortable passage of two cars. Conner and Yorgason plan to build new roads to access the new homes, but neighbors worry traffic will increase on existing roads, making them even more dangerous.

So far, the city has not issued building permits for Highlands Cove. The Public Works Department is reviewing an application for permit for grading, the first step in building the subdivision.

The developers had hoped to break ground this spring. That now seems unlikely, given the undecided status of the court case.

If the project is allowed to move forward, the city would limit exterior construction work, such as grading, utility and roadway construction, to the hours between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m., Monday through Friday, and 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday, in order to reduce noise impact on the existing neighborhood.

The council's discussion of the transportation plan is set to take place during a work session Tuesday afternoon. The work session is scheduled to begin at 3:30 p.m. in the council's third-floor chambers at City Hall, 150 N. Capitol Blvd.

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