Boise & Garden City

Boise, Highlands Cove neighbors, developers brace for court battle

A view of the east end of the Crane Creek Golf Course, looking north toward the end of Chardie Road and a cluster of homes around Chardie Court, which ends in a cul-de-sac. Developers Chris Conner and Dave Yorgason plan to build 57 homes on 54 acres wrapping around this part of the golf course. Their subdivision would include homes on an extended Chardie Road east of Chardie Court and more homes on the east and south sides of the golf course.
A view of the east end of the Crane Creek Golf Course, looking north toward the end of Chardie Road and a cluster of homes around Chardie Court, which ends in a cul-de-sac. Developers Chris Conner and Dave Yorgason plan to build 57 homes on 54 acres wrapping around this part of the golf course. Their subdivision would include homes on an extended Chardie Road east of Chardie Court and more homes on the east and south sides of the golf course.

People who live near the Crane Creek golf course haven't given up fighting Dave Yorgason's and Chris Conner's proposed 57-home Highlands Cove development in the Boise Foothills.

Neighbors say they're amassing donations for a court battle against the Boise City Council's December approval of the project. They're preparing for what's called "judicial review" — asking a judge to overturn the council's decision.

Before a judge can hear those arguments, though, a different, but related, court battle has to be settled. A disagreement has emerged on the deadline for submitting an application for judicial review. Neighbors and their attorney think the deadline hasn't passed yet. The city, which would be the defendant, isn't so sure.

Neighbors have fought vehemently against Yorgason and Conner's plan to build Highlands Cove around the east end of the golf course. Their latest complaint against the city and Ada County Highway District, which controls public roads throughout the county, has to do with re-alignment of Sunset Peak Road on the south side of the proposed subdivision.

The City Council included a condition in its approval of the project that prohibited the developers from re-aligning Sunset Peak Road to make room for an additional three lots. The highway district nixed he re-alignment aspect of that condition because it would have led to an undesirable street layout in the neighborhood.

Boise Planning Director Hal Simmons said the council's priority — eliminating three buildable lots — has been met. In fact, he said, the city has no authority to determine the alignment of public roads. The highway district makes those decisions.

Despite the ongoing dispute, Yorgason said Friday he's confident Highlands Cove will be built.

"It's just a question of when," he said. "We're prepared to take this all the way through. The actions of the neighbors have not surprised us. We're prepared for it."

Yorgason said he and his team are working out details for grading, the first step in building the subdivision. Yorgason said he hopes to break ground on that phase this spring and start building homes by the end of the year.

He said 40 people already are on a wait list to buy homes in Highlands Cove, even though he and his team haven't started marketing them yet or even determined how much they'll cost.

He hopes to start moving people into the new homes in the spring or summer of 2017.

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