Boise & Garden City

With McLean leaving Boise council to run for mayor, a newcomer wants to take her place

Signatures delivered to city clerk: Two issues for November

Boise Working Together, a citizen group, collected more than 14,000 signatures to put the city’s stadium and library on the ballot in November. Ada County officials have 60 days to verify the signatures.
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Boise Working Together, a citizen group, collected more than 14,000 signatures to put the city’s stadium and library on the ballot in November. Ada County officials have 60 days to verify the signatures.

Brady Fuller, a Boise native, announced Tuesday that he would run to fill the Boise City Council seat being vacated by Lauren McLean, the council’s president.

McLean announced Monday that she is running for mayor, a direct challenge to Boise’s mayor since 2004, David Bieter. That decision will leave her seat on the council open, and Fuller, 25, said in a telephone interview Tuesday that prompted him to run for it specifically.

“I think the city is ready for a fresh new voice, a fresh new perspective,” Fuller said. “I want to get involved as a younger person and ensure our city is sustainable for the next 10, 20, 30 years.”

Three of the six council seats are up for grabs every two years. In November, Boise voters will choose candidates for Seats 1, 3 and 5. Boise has at-large council elections, and the numbers don’t represent any seniority or privilege. For instance, if Fuller were to win McLean’s seat, which is Seat 1, he would not automatically also get her title of council president.

Fuller is the first to announce his intention to run for McLean’s seat. He had previously campaigned for Seat 3, which will be open because incumbent Scot Ludwig said he would not be running again.

Seat 5 is held by Council President Pro Tem Elaine Clegg. She has not said whether she plans to run again.

Other candidates running for council seats include Jimmy Hallyburton and Debbie Lombard-Bloom. Candidates don’t have to declare the seat they’re running for until August, Fuller said.

Fuller said he has spoken with hundreds of people since first announcing he was running for the council, including neighbors, business owners and directors of organizations. Growth in the city is people’s primary concern, he said.

Fuller hopes to “promote responsible growth,” he said Tuesday. To him, that means promoting affordable housing and improving transportation, as well as pushing for reasonably priced child care.

“If you’ve lived here for your whole life or you just moved here last year, you can see Boise is experiencing unprecedented growth,” Fuller said. “People are excited about that but also concerned. I want to help make sure that the people here can continue to flourish.”

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Hayley covers local government for the Idaho Statesman with a primary focus on Boise. Previously, she worked for the Salisbury Daily Times, the Hartford Courant, the Denver Post and McClatchy’s D.C. bureau. Hayley graduated from Ohio University with degrees in journalism and political science.If you like seeing stories like this, please consider supporting our work with a digital subscription to the Idaho Statesman.

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