Boise & Garden City

Hundreds fought this NW Boise development last spring. Here’s what’s going on now

Homeowners in Northwest Boise rally to oppose more development as opens spaces vanish

Richard Llewellyn addresses a gathering of about 320 residents at a meeting of the North West Neighborhood Association of Boise at Shadow Hills Elementary. The group is rallying opposition to a planned development along Hill Road Parkway.
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Richard Llewellyn addresses a gathering of about 320 residents at a meeting of the North West Neighborhood Association of Boise at Shadow Hills Elementary. The group is rallying opposition to a planned development along Hill Road Parkway.

One of Boise’s most active developers in recent years is changing its proposal for Prominence, a 38-acre development in Northwest Boise, a consultant told the Idaho Statesman in a telephone conversation Wednesday.

Trilogy Development, which has an office in Boise and is owned by John A. Laude Sr., originally planned to build 307 townhouses and standalone homes on 38.4 acres west of Bogart Lane on both sides of Hill Road Parkway. But that plan has stalled since spring, when neighbors in the semi-rural area revolted, calling the project “our worst nightmare.”

Consultant Jane Suggs said declined to comment on what, exactly, Trilogy is changing.

Once Trilogy has a new plan, she said, it will host a new neighborhood meeting.

Some thought Trilogy’s application had expired, because the city’s webpage for the project read “expired: 8/26/18.” In a Nov. 20 Facebook post, North West Boise Neighborhood Association President Richard Llewellyn shared a letter from association Secretary Neil Parker that exhibited relief.

“So, to put all this in “hunting terms,” or more appropriately in “self defense” terms, you could say that we were “loaded for bear” and then the bear chose or was persuaded to not come out of the woods into the clearing where we could tangle,” the post reads. “But this does not mean that that bear has died of old age. No, he’s still in there biding his time, maybe reevaluating things, probably strategizing his next move. And through it all, keeping his cards close to his chest — if bears played cards, I suppose.”

But Prominence hasn’t expired, said Brent Moore, the city of Boise planner assigned to the project.

Though approval of projects can expire, Moore said, applications generally do not if they haven’t yet received approval from the city.

Trilogy has taken on several high-profile projects around the Treasure Valley recently, including 154 townhomes near the corner of State and Roe streets; 105 upscale houses in Eagle; and Sabana, a small but controversial project on Boise’s southwestern edge.

Though they hope for a good outcome, some neighbors have grown suspicious of City Hall, Llewellyn said Friday in a telephone conversation. They doubt the city will reject Trilogy’s plan or insist on a project that doesn’t make the neighborhood worse, he said.

Llewellyn said many neighbors’ first interaction with City Hall was in 2014, when Boise annexed their homes in the area northwest of the Garden City between State Street, Hill Road, Gary Lane and Horseshoe Bend Road. Since then, they’ve seen project after project fill empty fields with houses and townhomes or apartments, shifting the character of the neighborhood away from its agricultural roots, he said.

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