Local

Boise community to gather for Day of the Dead

Foothills School Dia de los Muertos

Students and guest artists at Foothills School and the Consulate of Mexico made altars for Dia de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead, honors family, friends and loved ones who have passed away.
Up Next
Students and guest artists at Foothills School and the Consulate of Mexico made altars for Dia de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead, honors family, friends and loved ones who have passed away.

The community group Friends of Jesus Urquides invites the public to celebrate the life of Urquides, a distinguished Mexican pioneer in remembrance of Dia de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead.

The celebration will take place from 4 to 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 2. It will begin at the Jesus Urquides Memorial at Main and 1st Street near Broadway Avenue in Boise. It will then move at 5 p.m. to Urquides’ gravesite at nearby Pioneer Cemetery on Warm Springs Avenue.

The cemetery celebration will include local author Max Delgado sharing stories about Boise’s Old Spanish Village (located near the memorial) where Urquides lived with his family. Boise artist Dwaine Carver, who designed the memorial, will speak about the public art aspects of the design.

Ana Maria Schachtell will host the celebration, joined by dancer Norma Pintar who will perform pre-Columbian dances at the cemetery. Guests will also enjoy traditional Pan de Muertos and hot chocolate.

More about Urquides:

Jesús Urquides arrived in Idaho around 1860 from Sonora, Mexico, via California. He became a renowned muleteer because of his talents transporting goods to miners in remote camps and other accomplishments. He was also a prominent citizen and founder of the neighborhood known as Spanish Village that stood where Broadway meets Main Street from around 1863, when Boise was founded, to 1973 when it was condemned by the city and torn down.

Urquides lived with his family in Spanish Village until his death in 1928. His daughter Lola remained in the village and shared stories of her father until she died in the 1960s.

In 2013, as part of its sesquicentennial celebration, the city of Boise dedicated the Jesus Urquides Memorial on the sidewalk where the Spanish Village was located.

More about Dia de los Muertos:

The holiday is a time to remember, honor, and celebrate the lives of community members who have passed on. It is also a time to reflect upon personal lives and the cycle of life and death.

“It is not to be confused with Halloween and has nothing to do with images of ghosts, witches or the devil,” said Ana Maria Schachtell, organizer.

More celebrating:

JUMP Boise, at 1000 Myrtle St., will also host a celebration from 5 to 8 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 2. The free celebration includes pan de muerto and hot chocolate, traditional Day of the Dead treats from the The Mexican Consulate; face painting with Foothills School of Arts and Sciences; performances by the Hispanic Folkloric Dancers, Ballet Folklorico Mexico Lindo, Danza Azteca, Norma Pintar, Whitney Elementary School Choir, Quinceañero program and the Foothills School of Arts and Sciences.

Altars by Mariana Gutierrez, Mario Espinoza, Bobby Gaytán, Sonya Rosario, Foothills School of Arts and Sciences, The Mexican Consulate, Quinceañero program, Montoya Insurance, Idaho Central Credit Union, Idaho Commission on the Arts, Idaho Commission on Hispanic Affairs and Danza Azteca will be on display.

  Comments