Food & Drink

Have a laid-back summer, the Heming-way

Author Ernest Hemingway was known to imbibe up to a dozen of these at his favorite Cuban bar El Floridita, circa 1930.
Author Ernest Hemingway was known to imbibe up to a dozen of these at his favorite Cuban bar El Floridita, circa 1930.

Despite the numerous fruity, slushy, banana-laden versions that have been developed over the years, the daiquiri is a very simple drink to make. The original version, created in late 19th century Cuba, had only three ingredients — rum, sugar and lime juice — which is all it really needs.

But then along came author Ernest Hemingway in the 1930s, who was known to throw back a half dozen to a dozen in one visit to his favorite Cuban haunt, El Floridita — around the same time his summers were spent in Ketchum. His version added grapefruit juice and just a touch of maraschino liqueur. He also liked them slushy.

This writer chooses to stick to the original version on most occasions, but the Hemingway daiquiri is equally tasty and holds so much lore that it deserves classic cocktail status. A double version of this same drink is known as El Papa Doble, also named after Mr. Sun Also Rises. If you like the slush, break out the blender, but served up in a martini or coupe glass it is perfectly refreshing and won’t get watered down. And you won’t get a brain freeze.

Kevin Hopper is the bar manager at Capitol Bar on West State Street. He loves Manhattans and all things from the school of old.

Hemingway daiquiri

2 oz. Bacardi Light rum

.75 oz. fresh grapefruit juice

.5 oz. fresh lime juice

.5 oz. simple syrup

.25 oz. maraschino liqueur (I suggest Luxardo )

Grapefruit twist for garnish

Shake all ingredients except the garnish and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with a grapefruit twist.

Note: If you don’t have maraschino liqueur in your home bar, please consider getting a bottle. A little goes a long way so it’s well worth the investment.

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