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Grand jury indicts man accused in Boise mass stabbing

Timmy Earl Kinner Jr., the man accused of stabbing nine people, including six children at Wylie Street Station apartments, appeared in court via video from the jail on Monday morning, July 16, 2018. The preliminary hearing was continued until Aug. 14.
Timmy Earl Kinner Jr., the man accused of stabbing nine people, including six children at Wylie Street Station apartments, appeared in court via video from the jail on Monday morning, July 16, 2018. The preliminary hearing was continued until Aug. 14.

An Ada County grand jury on Tuesday indicted a 30-year-old man on a dozen charges, including murder, in connection with a stabbing spree at a child’s birthday party on June 30, according to a press release from the Ada County Prosecutor’s Office.

Timmy Earl Kinner Jr. was charged with one count of first-degree murder in the death of Ruya Kadir, and eight counts of aggravated battery in the stabbing of eight other people. He was also indicted on one count of burglary, two counts of aggravated assault and a weapon enhancement.

Kinner has been described as a homeless drifter with a criminal record in Utah and Tennessee.

He was scheduled to have a preliminary hearing next Tuesday to determine if there was enough evidence for the case to advance to district court. But that won’t happen now that he’s been indicted by a grand jury; he’s scheduled to be arraigned in 4th District Court at 8:30 a.m. Wednesday before Judge Nancy Baskin.

All of the victims were refugees living at the Wylie Street Station Apartments in Northwest Boise. Six of the nine victims were children.

“Five weeks ago, our community was shaken by the events of the June 30, 2018,” Ada County Prosecuting Attorney Jan Bennetts said in the press release. “On behalf of my entire office, I extend my deepest condolences to Ruya’s family for their unimaginable loss. our thoughts continue to be with Ruya’s family and all of the victims who are injured and their families.”

She praised Boise police detectives for working tirelessly on the case and her own staff, who have logged “countless hours.”

“We know the community wants answers and those answers will come through the court proceedings in this case. It is important that we preserve the integrity of the case and let the criminal justice process take its course to ensure Mr. Kinner receives a fair trial.”

She noted that her office has 60 days from the time a plea is entered on the charges to determine if they will seek the death penalty. She said that decision will be forthcoming, once “all the statutory factors under Idaho law are fully considered.”

Kinner has said he wants to defend himself but for now is being represented by three attorneys with the Ada County Public Defenders Office. His attorneys have sought to ban cameras in the courtroom, but their motion was denied. Kinner called the denial “sabotage.”

Boise police and prosecutors say Kinner summoned detectives to talk to him at the jail on July 20 through a “kite,” or written note, delivered from a social worker to jail staff, according to court documents. Kinner’s attorneys stopped their client’s conversation with police, but they said their client’s rights were violated by comments from a police officer at the meeting. They said their client never intended to contact police, and they’re seeking to bar future access to their client without counsel present.

Katy Moeller: 208-377-6413

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