Words & Deeds

Deeds: Comedian Christopher Titus is still dark, still inspiring in parenting show

“When things are going well, I get a little bit lost,” comedian Christopher Titus says. So he finds ways to stress himself out — such as writing, directing and producing “Special Unit,” a new movie. “And now I have to go edit it,” Titus says. “I wake up every morning sweating: ‘Oh my God, I didn’t get that shoot! It’s not going to work! This movie sucks!’ ”
“When things are going well, I get a little bit lost,” comedian Christopher Titus says. So he finds ways to stress himself out — such as writing, directing and producing “Special Unit,” a new movie. “And now I have to go edit it,” Titus says. “I wake up every morning sweating: ‘Oh my God, I didn’t get that shoot! It’s not going to work! This movie sucks!’ ” AP

Christopher Titus says that when he found out his then-wife was being unfaithful, he was sitting in a comedy club between shows. He almost didn’t make it to the stage for his second performance.

“I decided to kill myself between comedy shows,” Titus claims, phoning from Los Angeles. Considering that Titus’ mother and sister committed suicide, you get the feeling that this anecdote isn’t a joke.

Titus says he heard an unsympathetic voice in his head: You have a job to do, p---y! Get up and do the second show.

It was his dead father, a hardheaded man portrayed with hilarious malice by Stacy Keach in the loosely autobiographical, now-defunct TV sitcom “Titus.”

Titus got up and did the second show.

“Is that weird?” he says. “I was raised by a psychopath, but there’s a lot of upsides to being raised by a psychopath.”

It’s the sort of dark, uplifting logic that permeates his stand-up material, including his latest show, “Born with a Defect,” which hits the Knitting Factory on April 8.

Three days after that pivotal evening, Titus filed for divorce: June 6, 2006 — or “666,” as he quips.

The divorce was “horrible,” he says. It took years to finalize. But like most of the dysfunction and pain in Titus’ 51 years of life, his failed marriage inspired a show and Comedy Central special, “Love is Evol.” And like all of Titus’ thematic comedy, it included a path out of the darkness. Titus is now remarried to “an amazing woman,” he says — comedian Rachel Bradley.

“It doesn’t matter how bad your relationship is,” he says. “A lot of people stick through a nightmare. I wrote that whole special to prove that love is possible. ... The whole point is don’t be afraid to bail!”

So here Titus comes again — this time “Born with a Defect.” The subject?” Parenting.

With half custody of a 12-year-old son and 14-year-old daughter, Titus has plenty of material.

“I’d say 10- to 14-year-old boys are the stupidest thing on the planet Earth,” Titus says, laughing. “If aliens landed at my kid’s school, and they just interviewed 14-year-olds, they would vaporize the planet.”

In reality, his kids aren’t dumb in the slightest.

“They’re both on the honor roll,” he says proudly. “Parents go, ‘Wow, both your kids are on the honor roll. How did that happen?’ I say, ‘They understand I control the food and shelter.’ ”

If you’re a doting parent — say, like Cartman’s mother on “South Park” — Titus’ parenting philosophy might not be for you.

Most moms and dads at his stand-up gigs are able to relate, he says.

“If you are a parent, you have kids — this show is 90 minutes of therapy,” he says. “Man, parents come up to me after the show, and they’re like, ‘Thank you. I shouldn’t be laughing at some of this stuff you were saying, but ...’ ”

Other fans ask Titus when he’s going to relaunch his twisted, near-classic sitcom: “Titus,” which aired from 2000 to 2002.

That won’t happen anytime soon, he says, for legal reasons involving Fox television.

But Titus is writing, directing and producing a cop comedy movie called “Special Unit,” which is based on a pilot episode.

It stars disabled actors and comedians.

“It’s really funny. It’s really wrong,” Titus says. “If it came out the way I hope it comes out, there’s going to be a (ton) of controversy about it.”

Texas blues singer returns

Texas-based Hamilton Loomis has visited Boise a number of times — to shred on guitar and even teach harmonica lessons.

Loomis headlined the Boise Blues Society’s Sunday Blues concert in Julia Davis Park in 2014.

Loomis and his band are back — this time at the Sapphire Room at the Riverside Hotel, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., on Friday, May 13. Tickets to the all-ages show are $10 and $15 at brownpapertickets.com.

Movie/alcohol bill becomes law

Order a glass of wine and enjoy an R-rated movie at your nearest theater — legally.

Idaho Gov. Butch Otter has signed into law a measure removing language from Idaho code that prevented theaters from serving alcohol at sexually explicit movies such as “Fifty Shades of Grey.”

Brecker visits ‘The Other Studio’

Six-time Grammy-winning trumpeter Randy Brecker is my guest tonight in “The Other Studio.”

He’ll talk about the jazz scene of the 1960s and 1970s, plus share stories about jazz greats including his brother, the late saxophonist Michael Brecker.

“The Other Studio” airs at 8 p.m. Sundays on 94.9 FM The River.

In Scene April 8

▪  A restaurant review of The Counter, a gourmet burger haven at The Village at Meridian.

▪  Meet the princesses of Ballet Idaho’s “The Sleeping Beauty” and learn about the preparation that goes into the role.

Michael Deeds: 208-377-6407, @michaeldeeds

Christopher Titus, “Born with a Defect”

8 p.m. Friday, April 8, Knitting Factory, 416 S. 9th St., Boise. $25 and $35. TicketWeb. Opening: Rachel Bradley

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