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  • The day Idaho's Teton Dam broke

    On June 5, 1976, the 305-foot-high Teton Dam in Idaho broke in half. Its collapse sent a wall of water through the Teton River canyon, north of the town of Newdale in Fremont County. Downstream, with no canyon to contain it, the flood fanned out for miles across the Snake River Plain. The water turned south, gobbling up cattle, cars and homes on its slow march to Idaho Falls and beyond.

On June 5, 1976, the 305-foot-high Teton Dam in Idaho broke in half. Its collapse sent a wall of water through the Teton River canyon, north of the town of Newdale in Fremont County. Downstream, with no canyon to contain it, the flood fanned out for miles across the Snake River Plain. The water turned south, gobbling up cattle, cars and homes on its slow march to Idaho Falls and beyond. Provided by Idaho Public Television
On June 5, 1976, the 305-foot-high Teton Dam in Idaho broke in half. Its collapse sent a wall of water through the Teton River canyon, north of the town of Newdale in Fremont County. Downstream, with no canyon to contain it, the flood fanned out for miles across the Snake River Plain. The water turned south, gobbling up cattle, cars and homes on its slow march to Idaho Falls and beyond. Provided by Idaho Public Television

Oroville Dam threat in California places spotlight on aging Idaho dams and oversight

February 14, 2017 6:26 PM

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