Opinion

Trump statement doesn’t cover up his ‘Birther’ tattoo

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign event at Trump International Hotel, Friday, Sept. 16, 2016, in Washington. (AP)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign event at Trump International Hotel, Friday, Sept. 16, 2016, in Washington. (AP) AP

The presence of Birther larvae were noted during Barack Obama’s run for the presidency, which he won handily in 2008.

This subset of political conspirators hatched after that and were thick as June bugs around a patio light during the 2010 and 2012 elections.

I frequently ran into them at political events and watched them attempt to corner politicians from both parties and — with video devices engaged — attempt to get them to comment on whether Obama was born in the United States.

Blinded by ignorance and unfounded urban legend doctrine spread on the streets and on the Internet, there was nothing on earth that could persuade Birthers that Obama was anything but an illegitimate impostor serving as our president. Not even when Obama produced his long-form birth certificate in 2011.

By then Trump had ascended to, and enthusiastically accepted, the role as Birther-in-Chief, fueled not by fact, but by the ugliest political fiction.

Today with a 30-second statement acknowledging Obama was in fact born in the United States he tried to erase the Birther tattoo inked on his forehead.

After spending more time plugging his new Washington D.C. hotel at a press conference than acknowledging he led a legion of lemmings into perhaps the biggest lagoon of lies in recent history, I can’t get past this unforgivable part of his nature. He is incapable of assuming responsibility, fault or apologizing.

Trump may have moved on for political expediency. But Birther Nation lives — buzzing around the political universe even now.

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