Weather

Flooding spreads to Lowman; Boise River doesn’t hit peak flows

Swelling Boise River slowly spilling over near 46th Street

High temperatures have increased snowmelt from the mountains, and the Boise River is slowly seeping over its banks in places like 46th Street near the closed Greenbelt.
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High temperatures have increased snowmelt from the mountains, and the Boise River is slowly seeping over its banks in places like 46th Street near the closed Greenbelt.

As of 9:30 p.m. Friday, the Boise River still had not hit the expected and troublesome 9,300 cubic feet per second flow at the Glenwood Bridge in Garden City. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers had said it expected the river to reach that level, just 200 cfs below what was recorded in 1983.

The decision to increase water flows from Lucky Peak Dam came as temperatures rose into the 80s and 90s last week, increasing the amount of snow melting into the reservoirs.

The town of Lowman, as well as Boise, Elmore, Camas and Adams counties, had a flood advisory issued by the National Weather Service, to stay in place until 12:45 p.m. Saturday. Rain in the area was expected to contribute to minor flooding in rivers and streams.

Ada and Canyon counties have had flood warnings in place for weeks, and federal dam managers are watching closely as they release more water from Lucky Peak. The weather service anticipates that the Boise River will continue to flood areas of Boise, Garden City, Eagle, Star and Caldwell.

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