Elections

Idaho delegates grateful for Clinton’s embrace of Sanders

Idaho Clinton delegates Jesse Maldonado, left, and Caitlin Lister show their support for Hillary Clinton at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia.
Idaho Clinton delegates Jesse Maldonado, left, and Caitlin Lister show their support for Hillary Clinton at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia. Jennifer Kerrigan

Idaho delegates say they liked the message Hillary Clinton delivered as she accepted the Democratic presidential nomination Thursday.

Idaho Clinton delegate Caitlin Lister has a 14-year-old daughter and 3-year-old son. “It’s important to me that my daughter can see a role model like her,” said Lister. “It just seems like we’re moving in the right direction.”

Idaho Democratic Party Chairman Bert Marley was glad Clinton acknowledged and thanked Sen. Bernie Sanders for his help in pushing for a progressive platform and for engaging young people in politics.

“I thought it was a class move,” said Marley, a Sanders superdelegate. “She didn’t have to do it and I was glad that she did.”

While some Sanders delegates chanted or booed during the speech, Idaho’s did not, Marley said. He contrasted that with early in the week, when some Sanders delegates walked out of the convention.

“I wouldn’t say they were OK with it,” Marley said. “But compared to Monday, there has been a shift.”

When Katherine Aiken, a professor of history at University of Idaho, grew up in the 1960s, it was unthinkable that a woman would be president.

“Certainly when I grew up if a young girl said ‘I want to be president,’ people would giggle,” Aiken said. “It’s incredible to think that some people will have grown up to only see an African American man and a woman as president.”

Aiken is a scholar of the 20th and 21st centuries, specializing in social and cultural history. To her, the historical significance of Clinton’s campaign is more than just her gender.

“I think it’s also incredibly fascinating that she’s a former first lady,” Aiken said. “You never think of them being political beings with their own political agenda.”

Jennifer Kerrigan is a student journalist at Temple University: jennifer.kerrigan@temple.edu.

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