Traffic & Transportation

How fast are you going? ACHD will install radar speed signs to remind you to slow down

Put your phone down and keep your eyes on the road, suggests Boise Police Department

Members of the Boise Police Department traffic enforcement unit will be participating in the Distracted and Aggressive Driving Enforcement Campaign over the next month. Boise Police Department's Cpl. Wills offers advice on how to stay safe on the
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Members of the Boise Police Department traffic enforcement unit will be participating in the Distracted and Aggressive Driving Enforcement Campaign over the next month. Boise Police Department's Cpl. Wills offers advice on how to stay safe on the

Sometimes you just need is a reminder to do the right thing, like drive the speed limit.

Now the Ada County Highway District is about to give you that nudge.

The agency that oversees the area’s streets and roadways will install about 50 permanent radar speed signs throughout the county starting today.

The solar-powered driver feedback signs will show the posted speed limit and display the speed you’re actually driving.

A study done by ACHD earlier this spring showed that speeding is becoming a more prevalent problem in the county. It identified streets around the county that might benefit from the signs, including Orchard Street west of Franklin Road, Eagle Road at Mission Drive, and Franklin Road east and west of Eagle Road.

“We’re hoping people who drive these routes just needed a reminder to slow down,” said ACHD spokeswoman Nicole DuBois. "It’s not a (foolproof) method, but if we can reduce speeding at all it would be helpful, and it's a fairly inexpensive way to do it."

The individual signs cost about $2,600. With installation, the total cost for the sign project is $132,000.

According to a report by the National Transportation Safety Board released in 2017, speeding is the No. 2 cause of all crashes, after to distracted driving. It increases the likelihood of being involved in a crash, and the severity of injuries sustained. From 2005 to 2014, speeding was a factor in 112,580 fatalities. That's about 31 percent of all traffic fatalities, the report found.

The signs give real-time feedback but don’t record driver information.

DuBois said ACHD is planning a followup study to see if the driver feedback signs work.

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