Helping Works

Here’s how you can help kids get the school supplies they need

Young donors, the Valencia sisters, Elise, 7, Luci, 4, and Penelope, 1, are helping make a big difference for other kids this school year. The Valencia family is among local families pitching in to this year’s school supply drive at the Idaho Children’s Home Society. The sisters donated 10 backpacks, “boxes and boxes” of paper, folders, notebooks, crayons, markers and other items kids need for school.
Young donors, the Valencia sisters, Elise, 7, Luci, 4, and Penelope, 1, are helping make a big difference for other kids this school year. The Valencia family is among local families pitching in to this year’s school supply drive at the Idaho Children’s Home Society. The sisters donated 10 backpacks, “boxes and boxes” of paper, folders, notebooks, crayons, markers and other items kids need for school. Idaho Children’s Home Society

The nonprofit Children’s Home Society, housed in its historic building on Warm Springs Avenue as well as a Meridian office, offers a unique service — mental, emotional and behavioral health care for more than 100 children and their family members each day. The society, which also offers supports for children grieving the death of someone close to them, for children in foster care and more, never turns any child away for an inability to pay.

Each year, the society holds a school supply drive to make sure its young clients, many of whom are from low-income homes or living with foster families, set off to school with the supplies they need.

Here’s this year’s list (new items only, please): #2 lead pencils (packages of 12 or more); boxes of crayons (24 per box or fewer); white school glue, 8 oz or 4 oz (orange cap recommended); large pink erasers; rulers (12” with metric scale); spiral or wireless notebooks, 70-100 pages, college and wide-ruled needed; large packages of three-holed college- and wide-ruled paper; quality pointed scissors (Fiskars-type recommended); boxes of colored pencils; red pens or pencils for correcting; folders with pockets; water-based felt markers.

Pencil cases, backpacks and other small, fun, or colorful items are also welcome.

Drop donations off during business hours at either counseling center, 740 Warm Springs Ave. in Boise or 1833 S. Millennium Way. For drop offs at Warm Springs, come in through the east entrance and come to the second floor.

Contact Judi Williams at 208-343-7813 or jwilliams@childrenshomesociety.com with questions.

Also note, the society is accepting new clients who would like to receive services from its clinical specialists before the new year begins. The society offers extended hours, including early mornings, evenings and weekends. All new client calls are returned within one business day. To schedule an appointment, call the intake hotline at 208-343-7797 ext. 1238.

Help military families in a unique way, become a Legacy Corps volunteer

Legacy Corps volunteers for veterans and military families provide a unique service, mainly offering respite for veterans and other family members who care for loved ones at home. Volunteers receive orientation and ongoing training. They commit to serving 10-12 hours each week for one year. In addition to the satisfaction they get from providing a vital service, they receive benefits for their service: a monthly stipend of $167 and an educational award of over $1,500. Volunteers age 55+ can give their award to a child or grandchild).

Legacy Corps in an Americorps program through Jannus, with the support of St. Luke’s and other community partners. Twenty volunteer spots are available. Applications will be accepted August through October. The next service year runs Nov. 1 to Oct. 31, 2017.

Is this a volunteer match for you? Apply online at jannus.org or call 208-333-1363.

‘32 Cells’ art show will benefit Old Pen

Here’s a particularly cool art show fundraiser for lovers of art, history and a touch of the dark and sinister underbelly. Thirty-two local artists will show their work in cells at the historic Old Pen during “32 Cells,” 6 to 10 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 19, at 2445 Old Penitentiary Road in Boise.

Your $6 entry fee will help fund field trips to the historic site. The artwork on display is based on stories from the Old Idaho Penitentiary and the inmates that passed through its doors during its century of operation. The event is good for artists, too. They get to keep the proceeds from the work they sell. Guests must be 21+ with valid ID to attend.

Mayor Bieter holds Saturday office hours

Have some thoughts to share with the leader of our fair city? Here’s your chance. Mayor David Bieter will hold Saturday office hours on Aug. 20 from 9 a.m. to noon at his office on the third floor of Boise City Hall, 150 N. Capital Boulevard. The mayor will be available to meet with citizens to hear their ideas and concerns. No appointment is necessary. First-come, first-served. Each visitor will have up to 10 minutes to talk to the mayor about any topic related to city government.

The range of discussion can vary, with possible topics including neighborhood issues, ideas for the city to pursue, open space and parks, or anything else of importance to Boiseans.

Volunteers needed for Bug Day at the Idaho Botanical Garden

Bug Day is the celebration at the end of the Garden’s annual Nature Camp. It will be held on Saturday, Aug. 20, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Volunteers are needed to help take admissions, greet guests, transport guests in golf carts, help at the Garden Store and membership information table, and more. Sign up online at idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Walk to Defeat ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s Disease

ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease, affects nearly 30,000 people annually. The life expectancy of someone diagnosed with ALS is anywhere from two to five years.

The annual walk to defeat this disease will take place at 11 a.m. on Aug. 27 in Veteran’s Memorial Park. The distance is 3 miles. You can walk as an individual or as a team. You can join a team, start your own, or just donate to support a walker. Find all the details online at web.alsa.org or call event coordinator Amara Bates at 425-656-1650 or check out the walk’s Facebook page.

Walk spokeswoman Lauren Mamola said she participates and volunteers for the Walk to Defeat ALS “because my father is currently affected by this disease. Without the support, supplies and knowledge from the ALS Association, my family wouldn’t being getting through this horrible disease as well as they are. I encourage everyone who is free for an hour or two on August 27 to come walk and support this important cause. I also urge everyone to donate to the ALS Association. Without your donations many families in the Treasure Valley would be without a lot of the essentials and care that is so desperately needed for ALS patients.”

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