Education

Parents, scientists to lawmakers: Keep climate change in school science standards

Climate change doubles wildfires

A new study out of the University of Idaho and Columbia University shows human-caused climate change doubled size of wildfires in West.
Up Next
A new study out of the University of Idaho and Columbia University shows human-caused climate change doubled size of wildfires in West.

Teachers, parents and scientists urged the Senate Education Committee Thursday to keep climate change as part of the state’s new proposed science standards.

More than 100 people filled the Lincoln Auditorium as Jennifer Pierce, a geosciences professor at Boise State University, told the committee that climate change is real.

There is not another side to this story.

Jennifer Pierce, BSU professor

“There is not another side to this story,” Pierce said

Many who spoke before the committee pleaded with members to go a different direction than the House Education Committee, which voted earlier this month for the new standards but deleted references to climate change. The standards would replace ones adopted in 2001

Chairman Dean Mortimer, R-Idaho Falls, held off a committee vote until Monday, so the Senate and the House could explore options on what to do next. He did not provide specifics.

Climate change does not need to be part of the standards for school districts to teach it. But state standards would provide more uniformity in what students are taught.

No matter what happens to the standards this session, they almost certainly will come back to the Legislature in 2018 for a final adoption.

David Christainsen, of Boise, said the state would be criticized as a “climate denier” if the public school science standards did not include climate change.

  Comments