Crime

Boise man pleads guilty to destroying historic Trapper Cabin

The Trapper Cabin, severely damaged by a Boise man last year, was built in 1936 and is the only cabin of its type in the Payette National Forest.
The Trapper Cabin, severely damaged by a Boise man last year, was built in 1936 and is the only cabin of its type in the Payette National Forest.

Jason Reed, 22, admitted in federal court Tuesday that he caused extensive damage to the government-owned cabin, located on the French Creek Trailhead in the Payette National Forest, Idaho's U.S. Attorney Wendy J. Olson announced.

Reed told Chief U.S. Magistrate Judge Ronald E. Bush that he broke out the cabin’s windows, wrapped a winch cable from his father’s ATV around the deck of the cabin, and pulled the deck off its foundation in August 2015. He then wrapped the winch cable around a log on the corner of the cabin and pulled the two bottom logs, causing the cabin to partially collapse, he said.

The Trapper Cabin was built in 1936 and is one of two cabins left in Idaho that were built and used for predator control by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The Rocky Mountain style cabin was built with peeled lodge pole pine logs and mud chinking. It is the only cabin on the Payette National Forest that was built in this style.

The cost to restore the cabin is $31,919.20, according to the release, and Reed has agreed to provide restitution in full.

Prior to the damage caused by Reed, the cabin was in good condition and was eligible to be listed on the National Register of Historic Places, according to a U.S. attorney's news release.

The charge of destruction of government property is a punishable by up to one year in prison, one year of supervised release, and a fine of up to $100,000. Reed's sentencing is set for Nov. 14 in the federal courthouse in Boise.

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