Boise & Garden City

Boise family reels from loss of 31-year-old hit by car

Alan Poulton cared for his niece, Secret Leigh Oster, every day while Secret’s mom attended classes at Boise State University. Secret, an infant when this photo was taken, is now 3 years old.
Alan Poulton cared for his niece, Secret Leigh Oster, every day while Secret’s mom attended classes at Boise State University. Secret, an infant when this photo was taken, is now 3 years old.

Alan Poulton, who died after he was hit by a car Wednesday morning while crossing State Street, was a lifelong Boise resident who loved baseball cards and hanging out with his family, his sister said Thursday.

“Our whole family is just really, really close, and we’re taking it really hard,” Cassandra Sutton said, noting that both parents and all three kids lived within a couple of miles of each other.

Poulton, 31, loved children and “was the best uncle,” watching Sutton’s 3-year-old daughter, Secret, every day while Sutton attended classes at Boise State University. Secret and Sutton’s son, 7-year-old Halo, called him “Uncle Alo.”

“We sang a little jingle: ‘He’s Uncle Al, the kiddies’ pal,’” said Sutton.

Dwayne Alan Poulton II went by his middle name, she said.

He lived with his father, Dwayne Poulton, in a trailer just off State Street and was apparently headed across State to the Stinker station to buy cigarettes when a car hit him about 6:50 a.m. Wednesday, Sutton said.

Boise police are still investigating the fatal crash and have offered no information about whether the driver, a 45-year-old man, will be cited. Investigators said that Poulton was not in a crosswalk and that it was still dark when he was hit near 35th Street, just east of Veterans Memorial Parkway. He was rushed to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

Disabled after a long childhood battle with brain cancer that required 11 surgeries, Poulton didn’t have a job but in the past volunteered for the American Cancer Society and was a junior counselor at Camp Rainbow Gold, Sutton said. He graduated from Meridian High School in 2002, a significant accomplishment because he missed so much school while hospitalized, she said.

It was during a long stint in the hospital that he began collecting baseball cards, a hobby he continued throughout his life, she said. He was thrilled when his nephew started playing baseball, and he joked that someday he would own Halo’s baseball card.

“He was just really sarcastic and funny ... and so sweet,” she said.

Although Poulton lived on a small disability income, Sutton said, “if he had $5 he would go to the store and buy the kids candy. He loved making his family smile.”

He is survived by Sutton; brother Raymond Poulton; mother Jolene Hoisington; and father Dwayne Poulton. No public memorial service is planned, but family and close friends will gather Saturday for a private remembrance.

“He was disabled in some ways, and he never found a lady to love,” Sutton said.

“I can’t believe he’s gone. It sucks because to drive to school every day I have to drive right past the spot where he was hit.”

Police said the driver and passers-by tried to help Poulton, performing CPR before the ambulance arrived, and Sutton said that means a lot to the family.

“I just want to thank them so much for being there and with him and trying to help him,” she said. “I just love Boise for the people.

“I really hope that the person who did hit him with his car ... knows that we know that it was an accident. And I hope he doesn’t feel too bad.”

Kristin Rodine: 208-377-6447

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