Boise & Garden City

Boise taps 5 contractors for Greenbelt repairs. How long before flood damage is fixed?

Boise River flood damage could cost millions along Greenbelt

As the Boise River flood waters recede, city managers in Eagle, Garden City and Boise are now assessing the damage to greenbelt pathways. Eagle director of parks, pathways and recreation says portions of the greenbelt are still closed because of a
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As the Boise River flood waters recede, city managers in Eagle, Garden City and Boise are now assessing the damage to greenbelt pathways. Eagle director of parks, pathways and recreation says portions of the greenbelt are still closed because of a

Boise Parks and Recreation doesn’t have a precise budget yet for repairs to sections of the Boise River Greenbelt that were damaged due to this year’s flooding, director Doug Holloway said Monday.

The cost could run anywhere between several hundred thousand dollars and a few million, Holloway said. The city is still working out exactly how much of the Greenbelt was damaged and how badly deteriorated some sections are.

Parks and Recreation has identified four sections that need rehab, Holloway said:

▪  The Bethine Church River Trail, a gravel path north of Parkcenter Boulevard that was almost completely destroyed.

▪  The Veterans Park Pathway, a 2,400-foot asphalt path that is the largest section of Greenbelt in Boise that’s still closed.

▪  A stretch near Quinn’s Pond.

▪  A section between Capitol Boulevard and Broadway Avenue.

Riverside areas and bike paths are covered with mud, rocks, sticks and slime.

The city hopes to wrap up repairs next spring.

After being closed for months because of flooding, most of the Greenbelt is open. Exceptions include the Veterans Park section and the area near the West Parkcenter Bridge.

Parks and Recreation estimates Greenbelt users make millions of trips on the pathways every year. Holloway said a traffic counter tallies about 1 million trips each year just at Friendship Bridge, which connects Julia Davis Park to the Boise State University campus.

As water in the river recedes, Holloway expects to find more damage. The city wants to pounce on repairs as soon as possible after assessing their scope, Holloway said.

That’s why, at their meeting last week, City Council members approved five different contractors to bid on Greenbelt projects as they arise. The approved companies include some of the most accomplished in the Treasure Valley: Guho Corp., Knife River, McAlvain, Wright Brothers and Bricon.

Having those companies approved now speeds up the process for getting them to work, Holloway said. As soon as each project is identified, the city will ask all five contractors to bid on it. Contractors might end up working on multiple projects.

Boise has no plans to change the location of any paths, Holloway said.

In addition to the Greenbelt, Parks and Recreation expects to do some repairs on the Loggers Creek Bridge south of the Boise River on the east side of Broadway.

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