Boise & Garden City

Ada County puts off decision on 1,800-home Dry Creek project

One of the Dry Creek Ranch Planned Community’s village centers would share recreational facilities with an elementary school, the land for which would be donated to the West Ada School District.
One of the Dry Creek Ranch Planned Community’s village centers would share recreational facilities with an elementary school, the land for which would be donated to the West Ada School District. Provided by Ada County

All three Ada County Commissioners agreed Wednesday night that they wanted more time to consider the more than three hours of public testimony they heard before making a decision on developer Boise Hunter Homes’ application to build more than 1,800 homes in the Boise Foothills.

The majority of the dozens of people who testified Wednesday opposed the Dry Creek Ranch Planned Community, which would be built on 1,414 acres between the Hidden Springs housing development and Highway 55.

Many said they’re worried that if commissioners approve the Boise Hunter Homes project, the Dry Creek area’s way of life, unique in Boise, will be lost, as will the rich soil that supports local food production. More opponents worried about losing the cultural heritage of the area, whose farms played a major role in the establishment of the Boise area’s white population.

Other concerns included impacts on wildlife, including elk and mule deer, traffic and a community design that some said is in conflict with the surrounding area.

Boise Hunter Homes’ representative at Wednesday’s meeting pointed out that the developer has reduced the number of homes it plans to build by almost half, reducing density and adding a few acres of open space.

The county’s three-man panel of commissioners is scheduled to render a decision Tuesday.

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