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Why do we still follow daylight saving time?

Statesman Staff and The Associated Press

Do we still need daylight saving time?

Learn why we change clocks twice a year in this brief history of Daylight Saving Time.
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Learn why we change clocks twice a year in this brief history of Daylight Saving Time.

Yes, this is 2016 and your smartphone will update by itself.

But your microwave, your kid's alarm clock? You'll want to change those Saturday night before daylight saving time ends, so you can relish that extra hour of sleep.

The change comes at 2 a.m. local time Sunday, and the shift moves one hour of daylight to the morning from the evening.

Residents of Hawaii, most of Arizona and some U.S. territories don't need to fiddle with their clocks because those places don't observe daylight saving time. Europe made the change last weekend.

How does the time change work? Click here for the rules.

Daylight saving time returns at 2 a.m. local time on Sunday, March 12.

Why do we still do this? Daylight saving time is a brainchild of Benjamin Franklin, who suggested it as a way to save energy by lining up waking hours with the hours the sun is up. It didn't really take broad effect in the U.S. until during the two world wars and after the 1973 oil embargo.

States can decide on their own whether to follow the time change, though, and Hawaii and most of Arizona don't bother to change their clocks.

Idaho briefly considered jumping ship in 2015. But a bill in the Legislature that would have frozen us in daylight saving time was withdrawn for further study.

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