ADVANCE FOR USE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019 AND THEREAFTER-FILE - In this April 27, 2017 file photo, a police officer wears a newly-issued body camera outside in New York. In 2018, the New York City Police Department, the nation’s largest, stopped releasing body camera video after a police union successfully argued in court that they were confidential personnel records. But the department vowed in February 2019 to continue releasing video of officer-involved shootings after an appeals court ruled that the union’s argument “would defeat the purpose of the body-worn-camera program.”
ADVANCE FOR USE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019 AND THEREAFTER-FILE - In this April 27, 2017 file photo, a police officer wears a newly-issued body camera outside in New York. In 2018, the New York City Police Department, the nation’s largest, stopped releasing body camera video after a police union successfully argued in court that they were confidential personnel records. But the department vowed in February 2019 to continue releasing video of officer-involved shootings after an appeals court ruled that the union’s argument “would defeat the purpose of the body-worn-camera program.” Mary Altaffer AP Photo
ADVANCE FOR USE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2019 AND THEREAFTER-FILE - In this April 27, 2017 file photo, a police officer wears a newly-issued body camera outside in New York. In 2018, the New York City Police Department, the nation’s largest, stopped releasing body camera video after a police union successfully argued in court that they were confidential personnel records. But the department vowed in February 2019 to continue releasing video of officer-involved shootings after an appeals court ruled that the union’s argument “would defeat the purpose of the body-worn-camera program.” Mary Altaffer AP Photo