Business

Reggie’s Veggies has sold from a tent here for 23 years. Now a development is proposed.

Townhouse development could mean changes for Reggie’s Veggies

Reggie States has operated Reggie’s Veggies at Ustick and Milwaukee streets for 23 years. He hopes he can remain after 36 townhouses are built on the lot.
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Reggie States has operated Reggie’s Veggies at Ustick and Milwaukee streets for 23 years. He hopes he can remain after 36 townhouses are built on the lot.

For 23 years, Reggie States has sold cherries, corn, peaches, peppers and other fruits and vegetables from a covered stand at Ustick and Milwaukee streets.

Now a developer plans to build 36 townhouses on the property at 8157 W. Ustick Road. But the plan is for States’ business, Reggie’s Veggies to remain, with a building of its own.

“Nothing has been finalized yet, but the plan is to build a farm-looking store with roll-up doors,” States said in an interview Friday. “My plan is to go into their building. I’m kind of an institution in the neighborhood.”

The store building would be located practically where States has his covered tent, at the southeast corner of the intersection. One row of townhouses would be built south of the store and a second row slightly east of those homes.

“Our intent is to have him there,” said Steve Arnold, project manager for A Team Land Consultants, a Boise firm representing the developer.

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Plans for a 36-unit townhouse development at Ustick and Milwaukee streets include a commercial building where Reggie States, owner of Reggie’s Veggies, hopes to relocate. His business now operates from a covered tent at the same location. Provided by the city of Boise

Bear Mountain Holdings of Sammamish, Washington, wants to build the townhouses on the 3-acre lot. Each unit would have a two-car garage in back, with additional guest parking.

The development would also include a pocket park and a dog park, according to plans submitted to the city. The homes would be built to LEED silver standards. The group Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design recognizes implementation of green construction practices.

“These will be high-end units, so they’ll be really nice,” Arnold said. Prices have not yet been determined, he said.

Arnold said Bear Mountain hopes to begin construction in February. He anticipates it will take about a year to finish.

Reporter John Sowell has worked for the Statesman since 2013. He covers business and growth issues. He grew up in Emmett and graduated from the University of Oregon.If you like seeing stories like this, please consider supporting our work with a digital subscription to the Idaho Statesman.

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