This March 22, 2017, photo provided by the New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office in North Carolina shows Torrey Grady. In December 2018, North Carolina’s Supreme Court examines whether forcing sex offenders to be perpetually tracked by GPS-linked devices is a Constitution-violating unreasonable search. The high court considers the case of Grady. (New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office via AP)
This March 22, 2017, photo provided by the New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office in North Carolina shows Torrey Grady. In December 2018, North Carolina’s Supreme Court examines whether forcing sex offenders to be perpetually tracked by GPS-linked devices is a Constitution-violating unreasonable search. The high court considers the case of Grady. (New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office via AP) AP
This March 22, 2017, photo provided by the New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office in North Carolina shows Torrey Grady. In December 2018, North Carolina’s Supreme Court examines whether forcing sex offenders to be perpetually tracked by GPS-linked devices is a Constitution-violating unreasonable search. The high court considers the case of Grady. (New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office via AP) AP

NC high court weighs if tracking sex offenders reasonable

November 09, 2018 11:52 AM