Business

This study named Idaho the worst state for working moms. Here's why.

Lori Sapio plays with daughters Oona, 1, left, and Viola, 3, at their Chicago home. Sapio, who is a professional photographer and a mother of two, planned on staying home with her kids but went back to work days later.
Lori Sapio plays with daughters Oona, 1, left, and Viola, 3, at their Chicago home. Sapio, who is a professional photographer and a mother of two, planned on staying home with her kids but went back to work days later. Chicago Tribune

Analytics website Wallethub has some less-than-stellar news for Idaho moms just in time for Mother's Day: Our state is the worst place in the U.S. to be a working mom, according to a compilation of statistics.

The site noted that more than 70 percent of moms with young children are working, and women make up nearly half of the U.S. workforce. In Idaho, women make up 54 percent of the workforce despite comprising only 49 percent of the population.

WalletHub looked at three categories (made up of 15 metrics) to rank each of the 50 states and Washington, D.C.

Idaho tanked in two of the categories, ranking 51st in child care and 48th in professional opportunities. Though our state was No. 20 for work-life balance, it wasn't enough to salvage our overall score, which WalletHub tallied based on a weighted analysis of statistics.

Here's what the website weighed to calculate its scores:

  • Day care quality
  • Child care costs
  • Pediatricians per capita
  • School system quality
  • Share of nationally accredited child care centers
  • Number of child care workers per total number of children
  • Gender pay gap
  • Ratio of female executives to male executives
  • Median women's salary
  • Share of families in poverty
  • Female unemployment rate
  • Gender representation gap in different economic sectors
  • Parental leave policy
  • Average length of a woman's work week
  • Women's average commute time

Source: WalletHub

WalletHub noted that Idaho had the worst day care in the country, as well as the second-lowest ratio of female executives to male executives. Those and other metrics earned us a 31.04 score overall — out of 100 possible points. We were most closely outstripped by Lousiana (31.74), Alabama (32.12) and Nevada (33.94).

The best places to pursue your career while building a family? Vermont, Minnesota, Massachusetts, Connecticut and Washington, D.C.

Read the full WalletHub analysis here.

  Comments