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Marie Galyean: Nampa ad agency offers new wine film, VIP reception

The public is invited to attend the premiere of a documentary film about Idaho wines, produced by Peppershock Media. The film will be shown Wednesday at 7:15 p.m. at Northern Lights Cinema Grill at Karcher Mall in Nampa and on June 25 at The Flicks in Boise.

According to Director Drew Allen, both showings will offer a fundraising VIP reception from 5:30 to 7 p.m., followed by the film, “Idaho Wine, from Bud to Taste Bud.” Admission to the reception and film will cost $50 and will include wine tasting, hors d’oeuvres and a silent auction. Admission to the film alone is $10. Tickets may be purchased at the Northern Lights Cinema or at idahowinemovie.com.

Allen’s wife and business partner, Rhea Allen, is the producer of the documentary, and Conrad Piper-Ruth is the editor. Original music was written and created by Colin T. Fox, of Nampa, who plays guitar, drums and keyboard for the film. Drew Allen said that the film features interviews with winemakers, restaurant owners and state officials, such as Dustin Bristol of Brick 29; Ron and Mary Bitner of Bitner Vinyards; Butch Otter, governor of the state of Idaho; Steve Robertson of Hells Canyon Winery, Jim Mertz of Symms Fruit Ranch; and many more.

Art Director Angie Scobby said that the silent auction items will include wine baskets with copies of the film, and bed and breakfast at the Hat Ranch in Sunnyslope.

NAMPA CIVIC CENTER AUXILIARY ELECTS NEW OFFICERS AT ANNUAL LUNCHEON

A festive luncheon was held recently at the Nampa Civic Center, honoring the volunteers in the Civic Center Auxiliary and electing new officials, who will begin their terms in September. The new president will be Donna Bowlus, and the new vice president will be Diane Roberson.

Current President Dorothy Fox announced that auxiliary members had spent an impressive 5,790 volunteer hours in service to the center during the past year. She thanked them and her board of directors. The volunteers serve as greeters and ticket takers, and sell refreshments at intermissions in the center’s auditorium. Anyone interested in learning more about the auxiliary and how to join it may call Fox at 463-7710 or Bowlus at 442-7448.

Senior Event Coordinator James Brown, from the center’s staff, attended the luncheon and praised the auxiliary for its important work. He also announced that the two new event coordinators who have joined the center’s staff are Julie Corder and David Smith.

ANNUAL CUSTER DAY BRINGS GHOST TOWN TO VIBRANT LIFE JULY 11

One day each year, an Idaho ghost town bursts through the mists of time and presents an unforgettable look at a famous pioneer gold mining settlement of the 1880s, thanks to the work of the Land of the Yankee Fork Association members. This year the group is celebrating the 75th anniversary of the building of the impressive Yankee Fork Gold Dredge.

Association President Dan Fansler says the features of the day, on Saturday, July 11, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., will include demonstrations of old-time Dutch oven cooking, homemade ice cream tastings, butter churning, quilting, melodramas and blacksmithing. The professional Gold Panners from Idaho Falls will give lessons of the art of gold panning; there will be exciting shoot-outs by the Rattlesnake Station of Boise; and the Gem State Fiddlers will perform.

The restored “saloon” gift shop will offer souvenirs, cards, books, candies and beverages, and there will be old-fashioned food available.

Association board member, historian and secretary Blanche-Laura Herrick said the construction of the historic dredge started on April 1, 1940, and all the material came from Milwaukee by railway to Mackay and then was loaded on trucks to make the difficult journey to the site. The dredge was finished on Aug. 24, 1940, and visitors will find it is the best preserved gold dredge in the Lower 48 states.

Herrick said that to reach the Gold Dredge, turn off Idaho 75 at Sunbeam, northeast of Stanley. Follow Forest Service Road 3 along the Yankee Fork River for 12 miles. The paved road turns into a wide gravel road.

“Since you cannot drive to Custer itself, there will be free parking and shuttle service at the Gold Dredge area, about one mile from Custer,” Herrick said.

Marie D. Galyean is a journalist and freelance writer who has lived in Canyon County for more than 40 years. Do you have any news about West Treasure Valley people, events and other subjects of interest? Email your ideas and stories to: riedevine@cableone.net.

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